Posts from November, 2016

Sunset Sex: Loie Hollowell at Feuer/Mesler


Hollowell combines eroticism, landscape, and allusions to natural and human form.


Pedagogy on the Loose: A Book of Lectures by Liam Gillick


Industry and Intelligence: Contemporary Art Since 1820


Color Theory: Siri Berg opens at the Shirley Fiterman Art Center


Siri Berg: In Color, the retrospective of the Swedish-born veteran of hard-edge abstraction curated by Peter Hionas, opens November 17 at the Shirley Fiterman Art Center at Borough of Manhattan Community College. Berg, who is a thriving and active artist now in her mid-90s, will also be the subject of a documentary set to premiere…


X-Ray Vision: Mary Jones discusses her work with Brenda Zlamany


Mary Jones discusses her work with fellow artist Brenda Zlamany at her one-person show “Proxima b” at John Molloy Gallery (on view through November 26) and in her Chelsea studio. Really, the conversation began when Jones sat for a portrait in Zlamany’s Watercolor Portrait a Day project, which lead to an article here at artcritical…


The Review Panel is Tonight: Kerry James Marshall and Marilyn Minter to be discussed at Brooklyn Public Library, 7pm


Moderator David Cohen’s guests are Zoë Lescaze, Nancy Princenthal and Christian Viveros-Fauné   Reserve seats now  


The Obligation to Explain


One of the striking aspects of the controversy around Kelley Walker’s exhibition at the Saint Louis Contemporary Art Museum (CAM) is how many important issues it raises, including, obviously, the perilous state of race relations in the country; the dilemmas that arise when one person’s freedom of speech is perceived by someone else as hate…


“My work goes beyond metaphor”: A Conversation with Jill Magid


How is an artist’s legacy kept and remembered? Jill Magid’s recent work examines an estate problem.


Fulfillment Centers: Brett Wallace at ART3


This recent Bushwick show examined the relationship between digital and physical labor


The Obligation to Explain


“if Kelley Walker had made a cogent argument for his art… there would have been far fewer expressions of anger and outrage.”


A featured exhibition from THE LIST: Ron Gorchov, Works from the 1970s


In 2005, Vito Schnabel organized Ron Gorchov’s first solo show in New York in over a decade, focusing then as now on his output in the 1970s. Since then the veteran master of abstraction has seen belated and well-deserved adulation in the forms of exhibitions and critical attention. Reviewing Schnabel’s 2005 pop up in these…