DAVID COHEN, Editor           
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March 2009

FILM REVIEW
DAVID BRODY on
Brooklyn DIY
, directed by Martin Ramocki


Joyce Pensato's studio

 

posted 03/23/2009
GREG LINDQUIST on
Serban Savu at David Nolan

Although the architecture’s physical decay reflects its economic uselessness, such romantic titles as The Guardian of the Valley and Mountain of Nostalgia lend emotional value to these dour and severe scenes. These paintings speak to the failed utopian ideas in Communism. 


posted 03/22/2009
PIRI HALASZ on Jack Bush at the New York Studio School

What most truly characterizes Bush's mature work is a seriousness, even a gravitas that amounts to a truly Olympian detachment.


posted 03/23/2009
DAVID CARRIER on The Third Mind at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Like some earlier Guggenheim exhibitions, Mark Rosenthal’s 1996  splendid, mindless history of abstraction and the more recent survey Russia! are two examples, The Third Mind presents much great art without a convincing visual premise.


posted 03/19/2009
DAVID COHEN on Leon Kossoff at Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Commensurate with their disconcerting depth, Kossoff’s early paintings are literally and metaphorically heavy. The defiant sweeps of brush resemble nothing so much as tire tracks on a sodden road.


posted 03/09/2009
GRAHAM NICKSON on Pierre Bonnard's Late Interiors at the Met

For Bonnard drawing was sensation, and taking possession of the image. The next step was the translation of these notations into color, not local color, but the color that came from his interior logic.

 

Tribute
Sean Scully on Konrad Oberhube

Konrad was a profound scholar of Raphael, and widely acknowledged as such. He was in addition ‘athletic’ in his appetite for understanding and interpretation, that crossed time and geography. He was therefore both wide and deep.

DISPATCHES: Report from San Antonio


Marcia Gygli King


Visiting San Antonio, Texas for Marcia Gygli King's mutli-venue retrospective, ALISON HEARST discovered a robust art community of involved participants and high-caliber work

POETRY FOR ART
BILL BERKSON - OONA RATCLIFFE

POETRY FOR ART presents new poetry that responds or relates in some way to currently displayed work by a contemporary artist. To launch the series, BILL BERKSON's "Paolo and Francesca," a translation from Canto 5 of Dante's Inferno, is coupled with paintings by OONA RATCLIFFE from her show opening March 6 at New York's gallerynine5