DAVID COHEN, Editor           
       July 2005  

 

RICHARD PRINCE

Barbara Gladstone Gallery
515 W 24 Street
New York NY 10011
212 206 9300

April 30 to June 18, 2005

By BRIAN APPEL

 

Richard Prince Debutant Nurse 2004
acrylic and ink jet on canvas, 100 x 58 inches
Courtesy Gladstone Gallery

 
 
“I think appropriation has to do with the inability of the author/artist to like his or her own work.  Especially if the work is all theirs.  I think it’s a lot more satisfying to appropriate, especially if you are attempting to produce work with a certain believability, an official fiction let’s say.  If you take someone else’s work and call it your own, you don’t have to ask an audience ‘to take my word for it’”.
 
Richard Prince, 1978.
 
 
“Two cannibals were eating a clown when one turned to the other and said, “Does he taste funny to you?”
 
Richard Prince, n.d.
 
 
 
 
Even before I walked through the entrance to the reception area at Barbara Gladstone Gallery on west 24th Street in Chelsea I was hit with the strangely catchy, weird but funky country/rock music of WILCO (actually a “sample” on a loop playing softly over and over) that brought me to a pen on foam drawing of a whistling SPONGE BOB enclosed behind plexiglass in a rectangular wood box with a speaker coming out of either end.  I laughed at this unexpected, engaging combination of hipster music with a kid’s TV icon wearing square pants.  Wasn’t this the kid’s cartoon hero who was “outed” earlier this year by some fundamentalist Christian group for having a “hidden” sexual agenda?  Here was Prince in top form introducing his “newest” orchestration of multiple, overlapping voices combining the low brow vernacular of a cartoon character with the high brow subterranean sounds of a hipper than thou “independent”.
 
Richard Prince has been mining images from the low culture of the mass media, advertising and entertainment since the late 70s when he worked for the tear-sheet department for TIME/LIFE in midtown Manhattan.  Beginning with advertising images of jewellery, furniture and male and female models from various print campaigns in the late 70s, and then famously moving on to one of America’s most recognizable images of itself in the Marlboro Man’s ever self-reliant cowboy, Prince understood that isolating and removing mass-culture imagery offered an opportunity to examine various codes of representation including gender and class.  By re-contextualizing them by severe cropping or removing any ad copy or simply by re-photographing a black and white image on color film, the artist found ways to blur meaning and to create a critical dialogue with the objects created to satisfy the perceived needs of the expanding American consumer.  Playing the role of director, Prince has been appropriating and then later submerging these powerful cultural conventions through the various fine art mediums of photography, painting and most recently sculpture with the agenda of exposing universal cultural conventions.
 

Richard Prince O'Sexual 2004-05
wood, speakers, pen on foam, 25-3/8 x 76-1/2 x 10-3/4 inches
Courtesy Gladstone Gallery

From SPONGE BOB, “O’Sexual”, 2004-2005, I bounced over to the 2003 cream on white acrylic on canvas and t-shirt, “Oh Henry” “joke” painting with the text,
 
“Oh Henry let’s not park here, Oh Henry let’s not park, Oh Henry let’s not.  Oh Henry let’s.  Oh Henry.  Oh.”
 
This Borscht Belt classic, part of the Prince repertory or ‘act’ if you like, is a ‘prime’ example of the “joke” paintings the artist began back in 1987 (after 10 years of working within the photographic appropriation/re-photography mode) which mines the underlying character of 50s style, middle American humor.  Confronting issues of sexual identity, fantasy and frustration as well as class and social acceptability, the brilliant use of the t-shirt in the second panel of the diptych painting -- an ‘actual’ Blue Collar staple of costume and rebellion – adds a three dimensional, visual cue to the “yuk-proven” efficacy of the joke.  The inferred reference to the car not only strengthens the “Americanism” of the piece but also connects the viewer with the car hood sculpture placed just in front of the painting, “No More One Thing at a Time” from 2004-2005.  The bondo and acrylic material worked into an actual fiberglass car hood replete with raised “ram-air” receptacle mounted on a wooden “block” that serves as the sculpture’s pedestal is a stunning homage to the supposedly ‘primitive’ obsession with hot car restoration that some people impolitely call an activity of the “white trash”.  The upscale aristocracy and high-end intellectualism of the fine art gallery as receptacle of the culture’s most important conceptual and aesthetic activity is turned on its head with this car hood sculpture that looks scruffy and unfinished as is the case in suburban neighborhoods where people who turn their cars into hot rods never get around to finishing them because they run out of money, or desire, or both. 
 

installation shot at Barbara Gladstone, 2005

In the adjacent gallery there is another ‘car hood’ piece, this time floating on the wall like a painting as opposed to being up on “blocks” as if in the back lot of an under-cared for, overgrown, suburban backyard.  “Maverick”, 2004, is startling in the pure beauty of its application of bondo, acrylic and wood into/onto the surface of the fiberglass of the Ford auto part.  To say the car part has been transformed is an understatement; the all-American mass market quality from what could be referred to as the staple of middle-American, blue-collar life has been transformed into some apparition of its former self – as if the artist had spend several months looking for some hidden meaning or narrative perhaps in the fabric of the fiberglass.  Trading down has been replaced with trading up.  Prince has, as in his earlier re-photographed models from the 70s, successfully removed the object in question from circulation in the “low culture” and placed it in the realm of “high art”.
 
“Untitled (backboard) #2”, also from 2004, utilizes an actual backboard from a basketball hoop in a similar manner as with the car hoods but this time the rust from the oxidized metal creates a highly illusionist shape that harkens back to the copper metallic quality of Warhol’s “Piss Paintings” or the sublime floating rectangles of Rothko’s finest abstract expressionist works.  Here Prince’s love for paint and for the lusciousness of color totally trumps the tongue-and-cheek irony of using a gym staple as a source for fine art practice.  “Debutante Nurse”, an acrylic and ink jet on canvas painting from last year plays with the same kind of transformative appropriation but this time Prince takes his material from imagery from pulp fiction paperback novels from the 50s and 60s.  An ardent bibliophile, the artist has amassed an impressive collection of “naughty-nurse” literature and has transferred the book covers onto canvas manipulating them in the process by changing colors or replacing a nurse from one cover with a nurse from another.  The man who is known for his sophisticated critiques of the insidious myths of American consumer culture has focused in on the nurse as an ingrained stereotype that keeps on popping up and here, Prince isolates a pretty but melancholic-looking African-American nurse standing sternly with arms crossed looking out at us the viewer in a vaguely challenging way.  Perhaps she is assessing us as much as we are assessing her.  The text, “Debutant Nurse”, a naughty pulp fiction myth if there ever was one is stenciled boldly above the white surgical mask-covered face of the subject protecting her anonymity and creating a more standardized archetype for the viewer to more easily use as cipher for fantasy.  The vaguely familiar feel of the image is amplified by the Benday dots just visible under the wash of the paint on the surface of the figure.  These traces along with the still slightly visible logo and price point on the upper right hand corner of the painting (S for Signet and $0.95 price) signal an appropriated photographic source from the mass media.  There is a barely readable by-line of the pulp novel just below the title’s text as well which for me made the connection that the artist’s partial erasing rather than lifting completely is a new strategy Prince wants the viewer to take in.  Formally, the eye focuses either on the surface (the nurse and the bold text “Debutant Nurse”), or on the eerily obfuscated background (the dark emotive field of the broad sweeping brush strokes and the intentional and distinctive paint drips) slowing down the ‘reading’ of the work and creating two equal and wonderful parallel arenas of mise-en-scene in which to experience the painting.  The nostalgic traces of the original pulp fiction imagery along with the prominent references to abstract expressionism make for a unique marriage and heady mixture of pop appropriation and high art.
 
In Gladstone’s back gallery I saw people laughing and guffawing the first couple of times I saw the show.  I’ve never seen people laughing out loud at an art gallery before - especially while looking at art.  This was the exception.
 
“A guy goes to a doctor and says… doc I got this terrible case of discolored penis.  The Doc had never seen anything quite like it and asks about his daily routine… any prescription medicine any unusual athletics??  Nope says the guy.  The only thing I do anymore is lay around eating Cheetos and watch the Playboy channel.”
 
This text is on top of a canvas layered in Richard Prince’s own cancelled checks.  Here we have Prince ‘capitalizing’ on the use of repetition and multiples with these records of his operation as a corporate entity.  Talk about a “signature” artwork – all have Prince’s address in Rensselaerville, New York, his home town upstate – the same home that the Guggenheim Museum just recently acquired (along with a number of “car hood” sculptures and other pop art ephemera) and will be making available this summer for viewing.  Perhaps the underlying checks refer to the perception of Prince’s own allure as a proven excellent investment (his works have increased in value over 1000% in the last five ½ years).  Certainly he is tipping his hat to the prescient 1975 Warhol statement that “…making money is art, and working is art and good business is the best art”.  By applying jokes on top of a base of actual references to his own economic maneuvering, the artist is commenting on his own commercial control of his artistic practice while simultaneously asking us to reflect on the notion that jokes are simply lighthearted fun.  The sexual fantasies and the frustrations associated with middle class America as ostensible subject matter (upon initial reading) are merely a fog to wade through to embrace the ‘real’ dialogue underneath – of the complex role of the economy in today’s artworks.
 
And, in the back viewing area, a room awaits full of Prince’s 40 x 60” Ektachrome photographs from 1995-1999 that hone in on the artist’s complete fascination with symbols of class divide which separate the blue collar and middle class with the “haves” or upper class.  The “Upstate” photographs are a complete right turn from Prince’s earliest flirtation with the role of the medium of photography – here we have the artist using the camera to record directly what is in front of him in the ‘real’ world (albeit the specificity of the suburban region north of the city of New York) as opposed to the re-photography of the heavily mediated myth imagery from advertising like the “cowboys”, or the “celebrities publicity stills”.  A lone, aging basketball hoop in an overgrown suburban backyard, an inexpensive, raised swimming pool, a concrete barrier serving as a property divider, a highway with skid marks, a turned inside-out tire as planter, Stella Tennant (supermodel) posing as a “white trash” biker chick on a Harley Davidson – these are the identity markings and shared cultural heritage of the ‘new’ working class.  A class that doesn’t have the funds or the inclination to ‘prettify’ their immediate environment , and Prince has photographed them in a very similar, ‘amateurish’ style, one that befits the method of an ‘artist’ using the camera as opposed to the ‘professional photographer’ using the instrument in a ‘sophisticated’ way.  The format is casual (35mm), the film is amateur (as opposed to professionally color corrected) and the artist has used no additional artificial lighting to ‘enhance’ the image or built a special platform to elevated his camera from – they look like casual photographs where no editing or framing has been incorporated.  The super-sized blow-ups of the prints amplifies these decisions/non-decisions and we are confronted with Prince’s calling attention to not only his fascination with the markers of this life-style but also a way of working with the camera that fetishises the pre-digital, snapshot aesthetic of the tourist.  Of course the prints are judiciously numbered and there are only 2 copies of each image with 1 artist proof and there are none available for sale (everything in the exhibition was pre-sold or on loan).
      
Prince’s strategy of borrowing/stealing from a sub-culture that shares none of the sensibilities of the traditional “high concept” gallery is as old a trick as modernism itself, but Prince’s use of this new vernacular which is repeated again and again throughout this phenomenal museum style exhibition representing the cream de la cream of 25 years of his oeuvre is breathtakingly rare.  Not unlike acting and directing yourself in a movie, few can successfully pull this off – Prince does his own curating with great style finding subjects, identifying movements and affinities within his own aesthetic that succeeds in seducing the art-going public whose appetite for the new seems increasingly voracious.  His particular brand of show-hatching and packaging savvy is part of the profile of the “new”, up-to-the-moment-postmodern artist/producer who is extremely prolific (Prince has purportedly produced over a hundred “Nurse” paintings since starting this phase two years ago) creating not only a brand with many different “diffusion lines”, but has also redrawn the parameters of painting and photography in the process and attracted a more glamour-conscious, younger and media-savvy collector from around the world.  Richard Prince collects, writes, paints, photographs, draws, curates and produces books.  What’s on tap next could very well be his own reality show – perhaps the Richard Prince Experience?              
     
 
 
 
 

Richard Prince Upstate 1995-1999
Ektacolor photograph, 69 x 49-1/16 inches, Edition of 2 + 1 AP
Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York


 
    
 
 
Addendum:
Works by Richard Prince Sold at Auction in New York City within the last 18 months.

Paintings: 
 
1] “Untitled (Fireman Joke)”, 1987
acrylic on linen, 9 x 12 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Including Prints, Photos & Multiples, Sale NY010305, Lot #611, page 25, June 6, ‘05)
Estimate: $20,000-30,000 / Sold: $48,000.
 
 
2] “Untitled Joke”, 1987
acrylic, charcoal and silkscreen on canvas, 23-1/8 x 18 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010205, Lot #305, page 125, May 13, ‘05)
Estimate: $50,000-70,000 / Sold: $86,400.
 
 
3] “Untitled”, 1993
silkscreen and acrylic on t-shirt, 24 x 18 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY01025, Lot #304, page 124, May 13, ’05)
Estimate: $40,000-60,000 / Sold: $84,000.
 
 
4] “Untitled”, 1998
acrylic, silkscreen inks, graphite on silkscreen fabric and frame, 34 x 33 inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #450, page 72, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $40,000-60,000 / Sold: $132,000.
 
 
5] “Five Jokes Painted To Death”, 1987
four works, acrylic, graphite and silkscreen ink on canvas, each 14 x 11 inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #434, page 48-49, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $180,000-220,000 / Sold: $576,000.
 
 
6] “Untitled”, 2000
acrylic and silkscreen ink on stretched silkscreen fabric and frame, 75 x 63 inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #427, Page 38-39, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $120,000-180,000 / Sold: $408,000.
 
 
7] “What A Kid I Was”, 1988
acrylic and silkscreen inks on canvas, 75 x 58 1/8 inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #425, Page 34-35, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $180,000-220,000 / Sold: $531,200.
 
 
8] “A Nurse Involved”, 2002
inkjet print and acrylic on canvas, 72 x 44-7/8 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010105, Page 36-37, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $200,000-300,000 / Sold: $1,024,000.
 
 
9] “The Wrong Joke”, 1994
acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 56 x 48 inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Evening Sale 1516, Lot #2, Page 14-15, May 11, ’05)
Estimate: $400,000-500,000 / Sold: $800,000.
 
 
10] “All You Can Eat”, 1996
acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 83 ¾ x 96 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010504, Lot #155, Page 41, Nov.12, ’04)
Estimate: $100,000-150,000 / Sold: $209,600.
 
 
11] “Fireman And Drunk”, 2001
acrylic and silkscreen on gater board, 41 ¾ x 61 3/8 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010504, Lot #149, page 36-37, Nov.12. ’04)
Estimate: $80,000-120,000 / Sold: $187,200.
 
 
12] “I’d Rather Die”, 1993
acrylic on canvas, 24 x 18 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010504, Lot #122. page 17, Nov.12, ’04)
Estimate: $40,000-60,000 / Sold: $108,000.
 
 
13] “Lady Doc”, 1992
acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 107 ½ x 115 3/8 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010404, Lot #44, page 104-105, Nov.11, ’04)
Estimate:$100,00-150,000 / Sold: $388,800.
 
 
14] “Ranting And Raving”, 2001
acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 78 x 66 7/8 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010404, Lot #8, page 20-21, Nov.11, ’04)
Estimate: $180,000-200,000 / Sold: $411,200.
 
 
15] “Lady Psychiatrist”, 1989
acrylic and silkscreen inks on canvas, 24 x 18 inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1453, Lot #315, page 24-25, Nov.11, ’04)  
Estimate: $60,000-80,000 / Sold: $83,650.
 
 
16] “Boyfriend And Girlfriend”, 1998
acrylic, silkscreen and crayon on canvas with predelum; acrylic, silkscreen and crayon on canvas with predelum mounted on panel, in 2 assembled parts, 79 ¼ x 75 inches
(Sotheby’s, Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale N08028, Lot #530, page 166-167, Nov.10, ’04)
Estimate: $70,000-90,000 / Sold: $164,800.
 
 
17] “The Perfect Gentleman”, 1987
acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 56 x 48 inches
(Sotheby’s, Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale N08028, Lot #427, page 44-45, Nov.10, ’04)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $433,600.
 
 
18] “You Can Keep A Secret If Two Are Dead”, 1992
acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 68 x 48 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010204, Lot #179, page 43, May 14, ’04)
Estimate: $40,000-60,000 / Sold: $150,000.
 
 
19] “The Way She Looks In The Morning”, 1988
acrylic and silkscreen on canvas stretched over wooden panel, 86 x 47 1/8 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010204, Lot #158, page 31, May 14, ’04)
Estimate: $80,000-120,000 / Sold: $265,000.
 
 
20] “My Name”, 1987
acrylic and silkscreen on canvas [diptych], 55 7/8 x 96 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010104, Lot #12, page 26-27, May 13, ’04)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $747,200.

Photographs

1] “Untitled (Kool-Aid)”, 1983
Ektacolor print, 24 x 20 inches, from an edition of 2 + 1 AP, [front cover]
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Including Prints, Photos & Multiples, Sale NY010305, Lot #735, page 49, June 6, ’05)
Estimate: $60,000-80,000 / Sold: $240,000.
 
 
2] “Entertainers”, 1982-83
Ektacolor “gang” print mounted on foamcore, 40 x 30 inches, unique AP
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Including Prints, Photos & Multiples, Sale NY010305, Lot #610, page 25, June 6, ’05)
Estimate: $40,000-60,000 / Sold: $48,000.
 
 
3] “Untitled (Claudia Schiffer)”, 1999
Ektacolor print, 24 x 19 7/8 inches, this work from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010205, Lot #244, page 88, May 13, ’05)
Estimate: $25,000-35,000 / Sold: $42,000.
 
 
4] “Velvet Beach”, 1985
Chromogenic process “gang” print, 85 ½ x 46 3/8 inches, framed 87 x 48 inches, this work from an edition of two plus one AP
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010205, Lot #115, page 17, May 13, ’05)
Estimate: $60,000-80,000 / Sold: $96,000.
 
 
5] “Untitled (Cowboy)”1999-2000
Ektacolor print and publicity photograph signed by Casper Van Dien with felt-tipped pen and ink-jet text on board, 31 ½ x 40 inches
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 2, Sale NY010205, Lot #106, page 11, May 13. ’05)
Estimate: $25,000-35,000 / Sold: $81,600.
 
 
6] “Untitled (Man’s Hand With Cigarette)”, 1980
Ektacolor print, 20 x 24 inches, this work is 9 from an edition of 10
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #454, page 76, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $40,000-60,000 / Sold: $60,000.
 
 
7] “Untitled (Publicity)”, 1999
four color coupler prints on backing board in artist’s frame, 33 x 41 inches overall
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #452, page 74, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $30,000-40,000 / Sold: $66,000.
 
 
8] “Untitled (War)”, 1986
Ektacolor “gang” print in artist’s frame, 87 1/8 x 47 ¾ inches, this work is one from an edition of two
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #447, page 69, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $50,000-70,000 / Sold: $60,000.
 
 
9] “Criminals and Celebrities”, 1986
Ektacolor “gang” print on backing board, 86 x 48 inches, this is an AP from an edition of two plus one AP
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #446, page 68, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $70,000-90,000 / Sold: $168,000.
 
 
10] “Untitled (Publicity)”, 1999
six color coupler publicity photographs affixed to backing board in artist’s frame, 33 x 41 ½ inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #443, page 64-65, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $100,000-150,000 / Sold: $180,000.
 
 
11] “Untitled (Fashion)”, 1982
Ektacolor print, 24 x 20 inches, this work is number one from an edition of two
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #440, page 60-61, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $120,000-160,000 / Sold: $576,000.
 
 
12] “Cowboy”, 1986
color coupler print, 24 x 20 inches, this work is number two from an edition of two
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #435, page 50-51, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $100,000-150,000 / Sold: $284,600.
 
 
13] “Trix #2”, 1983
Ektacolor print mounted on board, 20 x 24 inches, this work is an AP from an edition of two plus one AP
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #428, page 40-41, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $120,000-180,000 / Sold: $284,800.
 
 
14] “Untitled (Oriental Glasses)”, 1982
Ektacolor print mounted on foamcore, 30 x 40 inches, this work is number one from an edition of one
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1518, Lot #424, page 32-33, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $632,000.
 
 
15] “Untitled (Cowboys)”, 1997
Ektacolor print, 50 x 70 inches, this work from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010105, Lot #5, page 18-19, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $250,000-350,000 / $352,000.
 
 
16] “Spiritual America (Two)”, 1987-88
Ektacolor “gang” print, 86 x 47 inches, this work from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010105, Lot #4, page 16-17, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $80,000-120,000 / Sold: $198,000.
 
 
17] “Untitled (Fashion)”, 1982-84
Ektacolor photograph, 24 x 19 7/8 inches, this work from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010105, Lot #61, page 164-165, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $408,000.
 
 
18] “Untitled (Cowboys)”, 1987
Ektacolor print, 24 x 19 7/8 inches, this work from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Sale NY010105, Lot #55, page 150-151, May 12, ’05)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $296,000.
 
 
19] “Untitled #9 (Cowboys)”, 1982
Cibachrome print, 20 x 24 inches, this work is number two from an edition of two
(Sotheby’s Contemporary Art, Evening Sale N08092, Lot # 21, page 96-97, May 10, ’05)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $216,000.
 
 
20] “Living Rooms”, 1977
four Ektacolor prints, 20 x 24 inches each, this work is from an edition of ten
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art Part 1, Lot #10, page 24-25, Nov.11, ’04)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $198,400.
 
 
21] “Untitled (6 Publicity Photos)”, 1999
six color coupler prints, each: 8 x 10 inches, overall: 41 x 33 inches
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1453, Lot #317, page 28-29, Nov.11, ’04)
Estimate: $15,000-20,000 / Sold: $74,090.
 
 
22] “Untitled (Three Women With Heads Cast Down)”, 1980
three Ektacolor prints, each 20 x 24 inches, this work is number two from an edition of ten plus two APs
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1453, Lot #311, page20-21, Nov.11, ’04)
Estimate: $90,000-120,000 / Sold: $186,700.
 
 
23] “Untitled (Fashion)”, 1980
gelatin silver print mounted on board, 40 x 30 inches, this work is number one from an edition of one
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale 1453, Lot #309, page16-17, Nov.11, ’04)
Estimate: $120,000-180,000 / Sold: $399,500.
 
 
24] “Untitled (Cowboy)”, 2003
Ektacolor print, 40 x 30 inches, this work is number AP from an edition of two plus one AP
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Evening Sale 1431, Lot #2, page 12-13, Nov.10, 04)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $298,700.
 
 
25] “Cowboys & Girlfriends”, 1992
color photographs in 14 parts, each 20 x 24 inches, this work is an AP, from an original edition of 26 with eight APs
(Sotheby’s Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale N08028, Lot #511, page148-149, Nov.10, ’04)
Estimate : $45,000-65,000 / Sold: $54,000.
 
 
26] “Untitled (Cowboy)”, 1999
Ektacolor print, 24 x 20 inches, this work is number one from an edition of two
(Sotheby’s Contemporary Art, Afternoon Sale N08028, [Front Cover Shot of Catalogue], Lot #505, page 140-141, Nov.10, ’04)
Estimate: $100,000-150,000 / Sold: $153,600.
 
 
27] “Untitled (Fayy), 1983
Ektacolor print, 36 ¾ x 51 ¾ inches, this work is from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, “Veronica’s Revenge”, Part 2, Contemporary Photography from the Lambert Collection, Lot #90, page 181, Nov. 9, ’04)
Estimate: $60,000-80,000 / Sold: $54,000.
 
 
28] “Untitled (Three Women Looking In The Same Direction)”, 1980
three Ektacolor photograph, each print 20 x 24 inches, this work is one from an edition of ten
(Sotheby’s Contemporary Art, Evening Sale N08026, Lot #3, page 14-15, Nov. 9, ’04)
Estimate: $250,000-350,000 / Sold: $736,000.
 
 
29] “Untitled (Couple)”, 1977-78
Ektacolor print, 23 ½ x 30 5/8 inches, this work from an edition of ten plus two APs
(Phillips de Pury & Company, “Veronica’s Revenge”, Part 2, Contemporary Photography from the Lambert Collection, Lot #89, page 180, Nov. 9, ’04)
Estimate: $30,000-40,000 / Sold: $45,600.
 
 
30] “Untitled (Girlfriend On Motorbike)”, 1983
Ektacolor print, 64 3/8 x 44 inches, this work from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, “Veronica’s Revenge”, Part 1, Contemporary Photography from the Lambert Collection, Lot #44, page 100-101, Nov. 8, ’04)
Estimate: $60,000-80,000 / Sold: $332,800.
 
 
31] “Untitled (Cowboy)”, 1986
Ektacolor print, 24 x 20 inches, this work is from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, “Veronica’s Revenge”, Part 1, Contemporary Photography from the Lambert Collection, Lot #40, page 92-93, Nov. 8, ’04)
Estimate: $100,000-150,000 / Sold: $268,000.
 
 
32] “Untitled”, 1981
Ektacolor print, 20 x 24 inches, this work is from an edition of two
(Phillips de Pury & Company, “Veronica’s Revenge”, Part 1, Contemporary Photography from the Lambert Collection, Lot #39, page 90-91, Nov. 8, ’04)
Estimate: $60,000-80,000 / Sold: $187,200.
 
 
33] “Untitled (Three Men’s Hands With Watches)”, 1980
 three Ektacolor photographs, each print 39 x 56 inches, this work is from an edition of one
(Phillips de Pury & Company, “Veronica’s Revenge”, Part 1, Contemporary Photography from the Lambert Collection, Lot #38, page 88-89, Nov. 8, ’04)
Estimate: $150,000-200,000 / Sold: $265,600.
 
 
34] “Untitled (Double Portrait)”, 1980
C-prints, diptych, each print 20 x 24 inches, this work is from an edition of ten
(Phillips de Pury & Company, “Veronica’s Revenge”, Part 1, Contemporary Photography from the Lambert Collection, Lot #13, page 32-33, Nov. 8, ’04)
Estimate: $100,000-150,000 / Sold: $102,000.
 
 
35] “Cowboy”, 1999
Ektacolor photograph mounted on paperboard, 68 5/8 x 40 ½ inches, this work is from an edition of three plus one AP
(Phillips de Pury & Company, Contemporary Art, Part 1, Lot #19, page 42-43, May 13, ’04)
Estimate: $80,000-120,000 / Sold: $230,000.
 
 
36] “Untitled (Cowboys)”, 2000
digital print on canvas, 92 x 209 ½ inches, this work is unique
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Lot #524, page 31, Nov.12, ’03)
Estimate: $80,000-120,000 / Sold: $290,000.
 
 
37] “Untitled (Four Women With Hats)”, 1980
four Ektacolor photographs, each print 20 x 24 inches, this work is from an edition of ten plus two APs
(Christie’s Post-War/Contemporary Art, Lot #522, page 28-29, Nov.12, ’03)
Estimate: $80,000-120,000 / Sold: $90,000.


 

Send comments for publication on this article to the editor