DAVID COHEN, Editor           
       June 2005  

 

SPRING ‘05 CONTEMPORARY ART SALES IN NEW YORK TOP $300 MILLION

By BRIAN APPEL
 


TRAFFICKING IN FLESH! Works recently sold at auction in New York, left to right: Lucian Freud Naked Woman on a Sofa 1984-1985, oil on canvas, 20 x 23-5/8 inches [Christie's, May 11, $5,616,000]; Marlene Dumas Cracking The Whip 2000, oil on canvas, 90-1/2 x 23-5/8 inches [Phillips de Pury & Co, May 12, $1,080,000]; Roy Lichtenstein Blue Nude 1995, oil and magna on canvas, 81 x  60 inches [Sotheby's, May 10, $5,280,000]


 
Buoyed by the increasing number of contemporary collectors who have reached the age where they are divesting themselves of their art, post-war/contemporary art sales moved into uncharted, record-shattering territory last month.  Fueled by the super-rich hedge fund managers who have recently caught the art-buying bug coupled with the re-emergence of the old guard art investor who hasn’t seen this combination of rarity and quality of offerings since the late 90s, auction tallies were pushed above the $300M mark over the course of four days in May.
 
In addition to high quality, rarity, and reasonable auction house estimates, there continues to be a growing hunger from collectors to acquire works that reflect their own generation’s spectrum of human experience.  All these factors place the contemporary art market into the most heated, fastest growing segment of the collectible universe.
 
Andy Warhol’s pop masterwork, “Liz”, from 1963, one of a rare series of thirteen paintings of Elizabeth Taylor from the “Cleopatra” phase of her career, was the crowning prize at Sotheby’s on the opening evening of the contemporary auction season with a ‘pop-star’ carry-home price of $12,616,000.  The vibrating, ‘naphthal red’ (blood red) background connects this icon’s embodiment of celebrity and fame (two of the artist’s fascinations) to form a trinity with mortality, and references the artist’s earlier ‘Disaster’ paintings including the ‘Car Crash’ and ‘Electric Chair’ works, adding to its status and sheer haptic value.  The painting’s provenance could not have been more impressive.  “Liz” was purchased 40 years ago by Irving Blum, the dealer who gave Warhol his first one-person show at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles.  Blum was purported to have paid $1,000 for the painting in early 1965.
 
Lichenstein’s late masterpiece, “Blue Nude”, (1995) painted two years before the artist’s death, and estimated to sell between 2 ½ and 3 ½ million achieved the breath-taking final sum of $5,280,000, taking away the second highest price of the night.  Experts have described this 81 x 60” canvas as “…one of the brightest lights of the Pop movement…”.  Lichtenstein’s oil and magna composition represents an extraordinary synthesis of many of the artist’s previous concerns, displaying reflections within reflections, mirrors within mirrors, interiors (both real and reflected) configured as a ‘Still Life’, as well as “…a monumental depiction of a sassy female nude that, in her sexy pose and coy expression, recalls the artist’s earlier leading ladies from his ‘Cartoon’ paintings”.  The fact that it was property from the Collection of Gianni Versace in New York certainly burnished desire – the auction house included in their catalogue a full page image of the painting proudly hanging in the entrance hall of the Versace estate at 5 East 64th Street.
 
Chuck Close’s, “John”, an acrylic on gessoed canvas from 1971-72 and the cover shot of Sotheby’s evening catalogue came in third for the evening at $4,832,000 shattering the artist’s previous auction record by a little over $2 million dollars.  The only painting to appear at auction from Close’s first series of signature motif portrait heads, this lot was acquired by the owner of the Bykert Gallery in New York in 1972 for $9,000.  The painting, the final work in this, Mr. Close’s seminal group of images, established the subject matter, technical approach and aesthetic parameters within which the artist has produced a body of work of critical importance to 20th century art.  Significantly, five of the paintings in this group were purchased by museums or institutions between 1969 and 1971, including the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in 1969 which bought one for $1,300.   
 
Also from Mr. Close, “Eric”, a mammoth-in-scale (100 x 84”) oil on canvas headshot of painter Eric Fischl, took the number four slot with a price of $3 million, 40 thousand.  This extraordinarily complex portrait (painted 20 years after the eerily factual representation of the earlier lot) abandons the likeness aspect for a fractured prism of details which coalesce into a resemblance only at a distance.  As one approaches the intimate space of the painting’s surface (within 3-4 feet) the recognizability of the image implodes into a kind of abstract amoeba-shaped visual experience that works more like a third century mosaic than a late 20th century effort.
 
Jeff Koons’ (1996), “Cake”, an oil on canvas work from his ‘Celebration’ series, matched the take home hammer of Mr. Close’s effort at $3,040,000.  This image smashed Koons’ previous held auction record for a painting by more than ¾ of a million dollars.  It is an ambitious ‘photo-realist’ painting that encompasses the artist’s obsession with the cultural and aesthetic paradigms of ‘High’ and ‘Low’ as well as his obsession with scale, craft and surface, and is part of a celebrated body of sixteen ‘photo-realist’ paintings and twenty stainless steel and polyethylene sculptures he began in 1994, which isolate and closely scrutinize a range of party detritus and the ‘gift’ that has been opened – in this case, a slice of cake.  Koons’ team of assistants (up to seventy were employed at one time) completed this labor-intensive and costly project – each crumb of the cake and each rosette of its frosting is lovingly rendered on a bed of what appears to be a metallic wrapping.
 
A sublimely serene Agnes Martin acrylic, pencil and gesso on canvas from 1975 ($1,472,000), a meditation on color and shape in a rare, important Ellsworth Kelly oil on canvas from 1968 ($1,696,000), a luminous oil on canvas Diebenkorn from 1956 ($2,144,000) and two major Basquiat bravura canvases, one 153 ½ inches long on a hinged canvas ($2,592,000), the other on tied wooded supports ($1,472,000) made up the balance of Sotheby’s top 10 of the evening.  Thirteen lots out of 73 offered were passed which kept any momentum garnered from really heating up.  In fact, in retrospect estimates were over-optimistic and had a cooling effect on events as they unfolded.  Sotheby’s final totals of the evening came to $68,036,800, above its low estimate of $63,100,000 but well under its $89.9 million high.
 
Sotheby’s morning and afternoon sales brought in an additional $25,987,600 with 276 lots sold at an average of just over $94,000 per lot, with Lisa Yuskavage, Neo Rauch, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Tom Sachs, Ed Ruscha, Gilbert and George, Lee Krasner, Philip Guston, Joan Mitchell doubling on their high estimates.  Frank Stella, Helen Frankenthaler, Louise Bourgeois, Sol Lewitt, Tom Wesselman, Richard Diebenkorn, Alexander Calder, Tom Otterness, Takashi Murakami, John Currin and Tracey Emin also performed splendidly with 25-30% more than their high estimates.  Mel Ramos, Jean Dubuffet, Andreas Serrano, Eric Fischl, Thomas Ruff and Nan Goldin were passed over.
 
Christie’s, the following evening, had it all.  Offering a perfect cocktail of abstract expressionist masterpieces, prime pop classics and one of Edward Hopper’s last great works of modern urban anomie, collectors from all walks of life came out with fists full of money in anticipation of participating in this most ambitious grouping of post-war art ever offered.  On top of this transcendent selection of virtuoso trophy works was the added catnip of 15 lots being sold to benefit the Jewish Communal Fund.  In addition to being one of the greatest acts of philanthropy (by New York collectors Donald and Barbara Jonas) this stellar selection of works, executed by such luminaries as Mark Rothko, Robert Rauschenberg, Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, Franz Kline, Joseph Cornell and others, was being offered with the bonus of being sales-tax-exempt in most states.  Ultimately, it realized $44.2 million of the evening’s take.  The auction house’s choice of properties and correct strategy of pacing resulted in 14 artist auction records being broken, 28 out of 65 lots beating their high estimates, and $133,707,200 exchanging hands in 109 minutes.  When Mr. Christopher Burge hammered down on the evening’s highest seller, Hopper’s “Chair Car” and responded with “Touché” to the successful buyer blurting out his name (Berry Hill Galleries), both parties might have been commenting on the enormity of this premier event and its new status as template for future post-war auctions.
 
Edward Hopper was 83 years old and still at the top of his game when he painted the haunting depiction of urban loneliness with “Chair Car”, from 1965.  In an era of existential philosophy, Hopper’s execution of subject matter that honed in on the solitude and anxiety operating beneath the cover of the seemingly banal, stage-like tableau of four people sitting together but apart in a train car, summarizes his whole career.  Apparently, $14,016,000 ($11 million beyond his previous auction record) was not too much to pay for one of the last remaining Hopper’s held in private hands.
 
Willem de Kooning’s 1949 “Sail Cloth” is one of a small group of ‘abstract’ works made in the late 40s which marked the artist’s dramatic leap into the uncharted realm of ‘pure’ painting, prompting the critic Harold Rosenberg to coin the term ‘Action Painting’ to describe the new movement then emerging in New York.  Invoking and celebrating the spontaneity and excitement of the act and process of painting, this diminutive, 22 ½ x 29 inch oil, enamel and charcoal on board effort was Christie’s second top performer with a $13,120,000 payday.
 
Mark Rothko’s, “Untitled”, (1964) consisting of three rectangles of varying color and intensity laid over a rich wine red background took the third top spot of the evening at just over $10 million, a bargain when compared to last year’s Rothko that was offered up and sold at Sotheby’s for $17 million in November.  The breathtaking quality of the oscillating color forms has always been the most accessible and seductive element of Rothko’s expression.  In this work, the deep reds and browns, reminiscent of the colors of his Seagram murals, generate a powerful if also sober sense of the depth and richness of life, transporting the viewer into their own feelings and emotions.
 
Andy Warhol captured the fourth highest lot of the evening, securing his second spot in the overall top ten of the post-war season, with “Flowers”, (1965).  One of only seven monumental-scale paintings from this famous series which the artist showed at a sell-out exhibition at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York in 1965 (and Galerie Sonnabend in Paris the following year), Warhol’s updated version of Monet’s water lilies was appropriated from a photograph of hibiscus blossoms that had appeared in the June ’64 issue of “Popular Photography” magazine.  Although consciously banal and superficially synthetic, it was enchantingly beautiful at the same time.  Quintessentially sixties in their colors and floppy petal shapes -- an early reference to the flower power generation and one of the artist’s immortal iconic images -- the instantly accessible and easy to serialize pop masterwork brought in $7,856,000.
 
In the fifth spot of the evening and sixth overall for the spring season, Philip Guston’s, “The Street”, (1956) shattered the artist’s world auction record by almost 5 ½ million dollars in spirited back-and-forth bidding.  Despite numerous requests for loans to important exhibitions, the collectors Ruth and Harry Kaplan (who have been in possession of this work since 1959) have not allowed this masterwork to be seen since the early 60s.  “The Street” represents the zenith of Guston’s achievement as a first generation Abstract Expressionist painter in the pantheon alongside his childhood friend Jackson Pollock and his cohorts, Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko.  It was this technique employing amorphous shapes and brilliantly nuanced passages of fleshy color that secured Guston’s reputation as a dominant member of the New York School. 
 
Franz Kline’s Wagnerian, “Crow Dancer”, (1958) and the cover image of Christie’s evening catalogue at $6.4 million, Lucian Freud’s impastoed, “Naked Woman On A Sofa”, (1984-85) at $5.6, Jasper Johns’ icon of 20th Century sculpture, “The Critic Sees” (1961) at $3.9, and Richard Diebenkorn’s seminal, “Untitled (Santa Cruz 1)”, from 1962 at $3.4 million rounded out Christie’s evening top ten.  Two rare boxes from Joseph Cornell, “Untitled, (Medici Princess)” circa 1952 ($2,592,000), “Untitled, (Pinturicchio Boy)”, circa 1950 ($1,584.000), Arshile Gorky’s ethereal, “Composition 11”, a graphite and wax crayon on paper from 1943 ($2,760,000), Luc Tuymans oil on canvas from 2000 entitled “Sculpture”($1,472,000), James Rosenquist’s, colossal slice of vintage Americana, “Be Beautiful” from ’64 ($1,248.000), and an androgynous Elizabeth Peyton oil on masonite, “John Lennon” from 1996 ($800,000), toppled their all-time auction records.
 
Christie’s continued their domination the following morning with a $20,990,800 sell through from 111 lots sold and $16,257,400 in the afternoon with 160 lots sold, bringing in a combined $37 ¼ million from the 271 lots hammered.  When added to the record breakout of the previous evening, the house recorded an astonishing $46 million increase from last November’s sale.  Richard Prince, Agnes Martin and Jack Goldstein garnered triple their high estimates while Julie Mehretu, Christopher Wool, Ed Ruscha, Wayne Thieband, Cy Twombly, Lucio Fontana, Harry Bertoria, Jack Pierson, Jenny Holtzer, Helen Frankenthaler and Andy Warhol took advantage of the “heated” contemporary market and doubled their high estimates.  Joan Mitchell, Alex Katz, Sigmar Polke, Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, Roy Lichtenstein, John Currin, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Martin Kippenberger and Gerhardt Richter took in anywhere from 25-35% increases on their conservatively priced high estimates.  Eric Fischl, Ross Bleckner and Robert Indiana were the only artists who received multiple passes.
 
Phillips de Pury & Company, the smallest house of the big three but the only one focusing on and apparently capturing the younger, edgier collector, made nice on their promise by pulling in $23,664,000, just $1.3 million below their presale high estimates for the evening.  Boldly starting their important evening sale off with photographic-based works by the likes of Richard Prince, Mathew Barney, Thomas Struth and Gilbert and George, Phillips hammered in over $2 million on its first ten lots giving heft to the notion that photography is leaving its stigma behind as the lesser of the fine arts mediums.  In fact, Phillips offered 19 photo-based artworks up for auction on this, the last evening of the spring auctions, and sold them all -- some at two to three times their high estimates.
 
“Catharsis”, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s 1983 acrylic on canvas triptych easily captured Phillips’ top slot at $1,584,000 nicely nestled within its $1.2-1.8 low/high estimate.  Ironically, written onto the top right panel, the artist had written “suicide attempt” with a dotted line scored underneath (a reference perhaps, to the drug problem that ultimately took his own life).  “Cracking The Whip”, a white hot Marlene Dumas’ 2000 oil on canvas of the backside of a female nude took #2 of the evening at $1,080,000.  The “bad boy” of German art, Martin Kippenberger, whose work has been featured all over town to great effect (most recently at Luhring Augustine) took the #3 slot at $1,024,000 with “Untitled”, from 1991 tying Richard Prince, the artist who is all over the art press as this moment’s Andy Warhol.  Prince, whose “A Nurse Involved” from just three years ago, whipped his pre-sale high estimate by $724,000 with the intense visual and psychological presence of a nurse appropriated from pulp fiction novel imagery from the 50s.  Chris Ofili’s, mythic imaginativeness of black popular culture in combination with painterly invention resulting in “Afrodizzia”, a polyester resin, map pins and elephant dung on linen artwork ultimately sold for $1,001,600 after spirited bidding to end up in the #5 slot of the evening at Phillips.  Along with some very positive press, an exhibition of Mr. Ofili’s watercolors currently at the Studio Museum in Harlem certainly didn’t hurt his performance at Phillips. 
 
Speaking of Richard Prince this season, he wasn’t only a top performer for Phillips de Pury & Company where ten representative lots garnered $2,668,000 in sales.  Fourteen Prince artworks with a low/high estimate at the Christie’s afternoon auction of between $1,280,000 and $1,750,000 brought in well over $4 million in sales.  Adding a $800,000 “joke” painting at the Christie’s evening blow-out sale and a $216,000 “cowboy” cibachrome at the Sotheby’s evening sale, Prince ended up selling $7,665,400 overall, placing him in my top 10 list this season (see ‘Artists Who Sold Over $1 Million – Spring ‘05’ below) with 26 lots sold overall to only one lot passed.
 
A Jeff Koons polychromed wood sculpture, “Yorkshire Terriers” from 1991($688,000), two Maurizio Cattelan works, “Untitled”, 2001, a stainless steel, wood, electric belt, paint and computer in two parts of a miniature elevator (with 2 doors) at $632,000 and “Turisti” from 1997 ($576,000), consisting of 16 taxidermied lifesized pigeons, a Luc Tuymans oil on canvas ($576,000), “Fish” from 1999, and a rare classic Andy Warhol graphite on paper “Bean With Bacon Soup” from 1962 ($576,000), rounded out Phillips’ top ten at the evening sale.
 
At Phillips de Pury & Company (Part 11) the following day, which closed the week of post-war/contemporary art sales in New York, sales were humming -- 300 lots sold from 349 offered, bringing an additional $11,543,360 for a total of $35,207,360 for the house -- a very respectable increase over last fall of $2,797,600.  Top performers included Martin Kippenburger, Neo Rauch, Juan Munoz, Donald Judd, Maurizio Cattelan, Gilbert and George and, big surprise, Richard Prince and Andy Warhol.
 
Although the post-war/contemporary art market is still expanding as more and more speculators are coming on board, seasoned players are saying it’s getting harder and harder to find undervalued artworks.  You have to constantly watch what’s going on in the market, and if you see something that has potential you have to act immediately because if you don’t, someone else will.  As in the white hot real estate market where buyers are resigned to paying dearly for prime properties, top post-war talent is expensive.  Unlike the real estate market, however, a fixer-upper is not in the realm of possibility.  What seems to be a high initial price can seem like a bargain if you choose works whose historical placement will ultimately produce a steadily rising performance.  See everything.  Pick an area you have an inexplicable emotional connection with and fall in love.  Then let the chips fall where they may.       
 
 
 
Jean-Michel Basquiat Catharsis 1983
 triptych, acrylic on canvas,  72-3/8 x 92-7/8 inches
[Phillips de Pury & Co., May 12, $1,584,000]

 
POST-WAR/CONTEMPORARY ART AUCTION HOUSE TOTAL SALES [SPRING ‘05]………………$300,004,200   
Last Season Total (Nov. ’04) $278,201,000.  Christie’s (Nov. ’04) $124,728,240, Sotheby’s (Nov. ’04) $121,063,100, Phillips de Pury & Co. (Nov. ’04) $32,409,760.  
 
 
1] Christie’s……………………$170,955,400 [Total Lots Sold - 336]
Including Evening Sale #1516 (Wed., May 11, ’05) $133,707,200/[65 Lots Sold] and Morning Sale #1517 (Thurs., May 12, ’05) $20,990,800/[111 Lots Sold] and Afternoon Sale #1518 (Thurs., May 12, ’05) $16,257,400/[160 Lots Sold] (+$46,327,160 increase from last season).
 
2] Sotheby’s……………………$ 94,024,400 [Total Lots Sold - 336]
Including Evening Sale N08092 (Tues., May 10, ’05) $68,036,800/[60 Lots Sold] and Morning Sale N08093 (Wed., May 11, ’05) $16,617,800/[149 Lots Sold] and Afternoon Sale N08093 (Wed., May 11, ’05) $9,369,800/[127 Lots Sold] (-$27,038,700 decrease from last season).
 
3] Phillips de Pury & Co……..$ 35,207,360 [Total Lots Sold - 361]
Including Part 1 [Evening] Sale NY010105 (Thurs., May 12, ’05) $23,664,000/[61 Lots Sold] and Part 11 [Day] Sale NY010205 (Fri., May 13, ’05) $11,543,360/[300 Lots Sold] (+$2,797,600 increase from last season).
 
 
 
POST-WAR/CONTEMPORARY ART AUCTION HOUSE SALES OVER 7 FIGURES [SPRING ‘05]:
 
1] Christie’s……………………………………. 34
Total of all 34 lots - $113,568,000.
 
2] Sotheby’s…………………………………….18
Total of all 18 lots - $47,249,699.
 
3] Phillips de Pury & Company……………….5
Total of all 5 lots - $5,713,600.
 
 
TOP 10 SPRING ’05 POST-WAR/CONTEMPORARY ART
(Final sale price includes buyer’s premium which is 20% on first $200,000 and 12% on the balance of the hammer price).
 
 
1] Edward Hopper
    “Chair Car”, 1965
    oil on canvas,  40 x 50 inches
    Estimate: on request
    (Sold at Christie’s, Sale N08092, Lot #34, May 11, ’05)
    $14,016,000.
    World Auction Record For The Artist
 
 
2] Willem De Kooning
    “Sail Cloth”, 1949
    oil, enamel, charcoal and graphite on board, 22 ½ x 29 inches
    Estimate: $8,000,000-12,000,000
    (Sold at Christie’s, Sale N08092, Lot #19, May 11, ’05)
    $13,120,000.
 
 
3] Andy Warhol
    “Liz”, 1963
    acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 40 x 40 inches
    Estimate: $9,000,000-12,000,000
    (Sold at Sotheby’s, Sale #1516, Lot #17, May 10, ’05)
    $12,616,000.
 
 
4] Mark Rothko
    “Untitled”, 1964
    oil on canvas, 81 x 69 inches
    Estimate: $8,000,000-10,000,000
    (Sold at Christie’s, Sale N08092, Lot #22, May 11. ’05)
    $10,096,000.
 
 
5] Andy Warhol
    “Flowers”, 1965
    acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 81 ¾ x 140 1/2 inches
    Estimate: $7,000,000-10,000,000
    (Sold at Christie’s, Sale N08092, Lot #38, May 11, ’05)
    $7,856,000.
 
 
 
6] Philip Guston
    “The Street”, 1956
    oil on canvas, 76 x 71 ½ inches
    Estimate: $3,000,000-4,000,000
    (Sold at Christie’s, Lot # 31, Sale N08092, May 11, ’05)
    $7,296,000.
    World Auction Record For The Artist
 
 
7] Franz Kline
    “Crow Dancer”, 1958
    oil on canvas, 78 x 69 inches
    Estimate: $4,000,000-6,000,000
    (Sold at Christie’s, Sale N08092, Lot #16, May 11, ’05)
    $6,400.000.
    World Auction Record For The Artist
 
 
8] Lucian Freud
    “Naked Woman On A Sofa”, 1984-1985
    oil on canvas, 20 x 23 5/8 inches
    Estimate: $4,000,000-6,000,000
    (Sold at Christie’s, Sale N08092, Lot #42, May 11, ’05)
    $5,616,000.
 
 
9] Roy Lichtenstein
    “Blue Nude”, 1995
    oil and magna on canvas, 81 x 60 inches
    Estimate: $2,500,000-3,500,000
    (Sold at Sotheby’s, Sale #1516, Lot #56, May 10, ’05)
    $5,280,000.
 
 
10] Chuck Close
     “John”, 1971-1972
      acrylic on gessoed canvas, 100 x 90 inches
      Estimate: $5,000,000-7,000,000
      (Sold at Sotheby’s, Sale #1516, Lot #9, May 10, ’05)
      $4,832,000.
      World Auction Record For The Artist
 
 
 
 
ARTISTS WHO SOLD OVER $1 MILLION – SPRING ‘05
Total sales of the 38 artists below $213,246,800 out of the $300,004,200 auction total.
 
 
1] Andy Warhol…………………. $27,988.600….37 lots sold….average per lot $756,449.
 
2] Willem de Kooning…………   $15,156,000…..5 lots sold….average per lot $3,031,200.
 
3] Edward Hopper……………….$14,016,000…..1 lot  sold….average per lot $14,016,000.
 
4] Mark Rothko….……………….$12,227,000…..4 lots sold….average per lot $3,056,750.
 
5] Roy Lichenstein……………….$11,574,400…..8 lots sold….average per lot $1,446,800.
 
6] Jeff Koons……………………..$ 9,721,600……8 lots sold….average per lot $1,215,200.
 
7] Richard Diebenkorn…………..$ 8,809,200.……7 lots sold…average per lot $1,258,457.
 
8] Alexander Calder………………$ 8,474,400…….9 lots sold…average per lot $941,600.
 
9] Chuck Close……………………$ 8,148,000…….5 lots sold…average per lot $1,629,600.
 
10] Richard Prince………………..$ 7,665,400…..26 lots sold....average per lot $294,823.
 
11] Philip Guston………..………..$ 7,446,000…….2 lots sold…average per lot $3,723,000.
 
12] Franz Kline..………………….$ 7,378,000……..4 lots sold…average per lot $1,844,500.
 
13] Jean-Michel Basquiat……….$ 6,983,200……..7 lots sold….average per lot $997,571.
 
14] Jasper Johns…………………$ 6,936,000…….3 lots sold….average per lot $2,312,000.
 
15] Lucian Freud………………….$ 5,616,000……..1 lot sold….average per lot $5,616,000.
 
16] Gerhardt Richter……………...$ 5,111,600……10 lots sold…average per lot $511,160.
 
17] Francis Bacon…………………$ 3,936,000…….1 lot sold…..average per lot $3,936,000.
 
18] Edward Ruscha……………….$ 3,850,000……14 lots sold…average per lot $275,000.
 
19] Ellsworth Kelly…………………$ 3,344,800…….4 lots sold….average per lot $836,200.
 
20] Agnes Martin………………….$ 3,138,400…….4 lots sold…..average per lot $784,600.
 
21] Marlene Dumas……………….$ 3,033,000…….5 lots sold….average per lot $606,600.
 
22] Luc Tuymans………………….$ 2,629,800……..7 lots sold….average per lot $375,686.
 
23] Wayne Thiebaud………………$ 2,489,600…….3 lots sold….average per lot $829,867.
 
24] Frank Stella……………………$ 2,472,000…….9 lots sold….average per lot $274,667.
 
25] Donald Judd……………………$ 2,449,600…….6 lots sold….average per lot $408,267.
 
26] Joan Mitchell…………………..$ 2,406,400……..6 lots sold….average per lot $401,067.
 
27] Maurizio Cattelan……………..$ 2,273,600……..8 lots sold….average per lot $284,200.
 
28] Mike Kelley……………………$ 2,196,400…….13 lots sold….average per lot $168,954.
 
29] Martin Kippenberger…………$ 2,148,600…….13 lots sold….average per lot $165,277.
 
30] Basquiat & Warhol……………$ 1,985,600……   3 lot sold…. average per lot $661,867.
 
31] Clyfford Still……..…………… $ 1,920,000……. 1 lots sold….average per lot $1,920,000.
 
32] Cy Twombly…………………..$ 1,612,000……. 5 lots sold….average per lot $322,400.
 
33] Andreas Gursky………………$ 1,609,200……..7 lots sold….average per lot $229,886.
 
34] Damien Hirst…………………..$ 1,593,600……..3 lots sold….average per lot $531,200.
 
35] Marisol Escobar………………$ 1,544,000……..2 lots sold….average per lot $772,000.
 
36] David Hockney………………..$ 1,250,000……..7 lots sold….average per lot $178,571.
 
37] Robert Gober…………………$ 1,096,800……..7 lots sold….average per lot $156,686.
 
38] Chris Ofili………………………$ 1,016,000……..2 lots sold….average per lot $508,000.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
 

 

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