Writings by David Cohen

Robert C. Morgan, Veksö III, 1971. Acrylic on paper, 23-¼ x 16-¼ inches, Courtesy Björn Ressle Gallery

Robert C. Morgan at Björn Ressle


Robert C. Morgan at Björn Ressle Gallery


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Linda Francis, Don Voisine, Joan Waltemath, Michael Zahn at Janet Kurnatowski Gallery, and Jennifer Riley: To Be A Thing In This World at LaViolaBank Gallery


In each picture, there is a sense that the overt structure is a kind of plan for the making of the work, while the work is the exposition of that plan. But, at the same time, the work is more than its own plan.


Fran O'Neil, Reel, 2009. Oil on canvas, 74 x 60 inches

Fran O’Neil at John Davis Gallery


Fran O’Neil at John Davis Gallery


Pierre Obando, Edits, 2008-09. Acrylic on canvas, 30 x 24 inches

Pierre Obando at Rush Arts Gallery


Pierre Obando at Rush Arts Gallery


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Leon Kossoff: From the Early Years 1957-1967 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash


Commensurate with their disconcerting depth, Kossoff’s early paintings are literally and metaphorically heavy. The defiant sweeps of brush resemble nothing so much as tire tracks on a sodden road.


Leon Kossoff, Seated Woman, 1957. Oil on board, 61 x 36-5/8 inches

Leon Kossoff at Mitchell-Innes & Nash


Leon Kossoff at Mitchell-Innes & Nash


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Stanley William Hayter in America: Paintings, Drawings and Prints, 1940-1950 at Francis M. Naumann Fine Art


Naumann has had the courage and good taste to break the medium barrier between Hayter’s experiments in printmaking, drawing and painting by presenting his work chronologically, regardless of – and mixing up – medium and support.

The resulting hang is very refreshing, and vindicating, to those afficionados sick to the hind teeth of Hayter being dismissed as a “technical wizard” in the etching studio, and therefore not, by extension, a “real” artist outside of it.


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Jean Prouvé by Laurence Bergerot and Patrick Seguin (editors)


Chelsea, New York gallery goers with an astute eye for furnishings will have picked up on the cult status of French mid-century modernist Jean Prouvé.  A vintage specimen of his legendary Potence lamp provides scant illumination and surreally displaced period charm to the very public back office at Sonnabend Gallery, for instance; a weatherworn school…


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Marlene Dumas at MoMA and Elizabeth Peyton at the New Museum


Dumas and Peyton are united in their limitations as well as their strengths—and, arguably, in their capacity to ensure that their limitations are strengths. Dumas’s photo-dependency gives her imagery political edge. Denial of sensory depth almost punishes viewers for yearning for it, reminding them of the urgencies of injustice and exploitation that this art – and their consciences – should be addressing. Peyton’s style wallows in its own patheticism, as if cloying, ephemeral, illustration-technique are symptoms of self-pity. Such knowingly retarded means sit perfectly with the basically adolescent emotion she taps, which is that of star-struck infatuation.


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William Tillyer: The Cadiz Caprices at Jacobson Howard Gallery


There are few abstract painters at work today who manage to push both metaphor and literalism so hard, simultaneously, as William Tillyer.