Writings by David Cohen

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Milton Resnick at Cheim & Read


There is a weird sense of a form searing its way through the canvas, from left to right, an accumulation of atomic energy boiling up the space it penetrates, making it a Monet for the nuclear age. It almost becomes tempting to read the image in cartoon-like graphic terms, or like a Futurist depiction of movement.


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Catherine Murphy at Knoedler & Company


The motifs of her seven paintings and four drawings are diverse to the point of perversity, suggesting the kind of mind drawn less to things than problems. What is consistent across these images is the sense of a fanatical empiricist picking quarrels with the perceived world.


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Delia Brown: Precious at D’Amelio Terras, Hilary Harness at Mary Boone


Hilary Harkness shares with Sade not just the pathology to which the Marquis lent his name but also an essential element of style — endless variation, at once exhilerating and enervating, upon an obsessive theme.


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Walton Ford at Paul Kasmin Gallery and Neo Rauch at David Zwirner Gallery


Neo Rauch is a prodigious talent. His canvases are lush with painterly dexterity, compelling characterization, and compositional intrigue. But, as with Walton Ford’s animal portraits, there is more about these costume dramas that transports viewers back to the amalgamated past they never knew — the very definition of nostalgia — than truly puts them in touch with a sense of being here and now.


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Thomas Nozkowski at PaceWildenstein


Even an astute connoisseur would be hard pressed to locate specific Nozkowskian tropes. There are some recurring motifs, but internal scale, texture, and mood present themselves in different coordinates. This is the more remarkable because Mr. Nozkowski’s modus operandi is so prescribed in terms of scale, medium, taste, and authentic touch.


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James Siena at PaceWildenstein


The experience in this richly diverse exhibition is not of transition so much as consolidation: the new works, whether big loopy abstractions in fat confident brushstrokes or weirdo figuration, seem legitimate outgrowths of the precious, tight, miniaturist Siena of old.


Alexander Ross, Untitled, 2014. Oil on canvas, 62 x 54 inches. Courtesy of David Nolan Gallery

Alexander Ross at David Nolan Gallery


His new show opens Thursday, October 30


William Kentridge, What Will Come, 2007. Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery

A Surfeit of Genius: William Kentridge at Marian Goodman Gallery


Seeing Double is packed with elaborations of his trademark idiom: imagery transmogrified


Alberto Burri, Nero cretto (Black Cretto), 1976. Acrylic and PVA on Celotex, 147.3 x 246.5 cm. On view at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, in their exhibition, Alberto Burri: The Trauma of Painting. Private collection, courtesy Luxembourg & Dayan

Alberto Burri at Mitchell-Innes & Nash


As Burri’s retrospective continues at the Guggenheim through January 6, a review from 2008


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Karen Yasinsky at Mireille Mosler, Alex McQuilkin at Marvelli, Isaac Julien at Metro Pictures


Where Yasinsky accesses early girlhood through dolls and dinky illustration technique, McQuilkin seems dedicated to a perpetual state of teenage angst. The specific identification of both with early cinema relates to a broader trend in feminist-influenced art.