Writings by David Carrier

Pat Steir, Self-Portrait: Reprise 1987-2009. Wall Drawing, ink and chalk. Photo by Christopher Burke , Courtesy The New York Studio School

Pat Steir: Self-Portrait: Reprise 1987-2009 at the New York Studio School


Taking subjects from the raw materials for old master art, Steir transforms them in accord with her very contemporary sensibility.


Peter Halley, Rectangular Prison with Smokestack 1987. Acrylic, roll-a-tex/canvas, 72 x 124 inches. Courtesy of Mary Boone Gallery.

Peter Halley Early Work: 1982 to 1987 at Mary Boone


10 September to 24 October, 2009 745 Fifth Avenue, between 57th and 58th streets New York City, 212 752 2929 In the 1980s, when painting was beleaguered and abstract painting under much pressure, Peter Halley was one of the few younger abstractionists who attracted attention. His distinctive hard-edge pictures were accompanied by his theorizing that,…


installation shot of the exhibition under review

Yan Pei-Ming: Landscape of Childhood at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing


By his critical reference to the illusions of the rhetoric of the Olympics, vastly expensive events which diverted funding from the fundamental needs of the population, he makes a powerful political statement, all the more potent because it is extremely elliptical.


stokes-cover

Ann Stokes: Artists’ Potter, edited by Tanya Harrod


Some artists change the way that you understand art history. Ann changed the way that I and many other people understood everyday life.


Wang Guangyi, Great Criticism: Andy Warhol 2002. Oil on canvas, 300 x 200 cm.

Nine Lives: The Birth of Avant-Garde Art in New China by Karen Smith; and Ai WeiWei by Karen Smith, Hans Ulrich Obrisi, Bernard Fibicher


It may seem odd to locate the birth of the Chinese avant-garde so close to the present, for in the West that period style label is associated with the late 19th Century, but in the early 1980s, China was emerging from a long period of being effectively cut off from the outside world.


Report from Berlin


Rothko/Giotto Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin February 6-May 3, 2009 Picturing America: Photorealism in the 1970s Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin March 7- May 10, 2009 Blockbuster exhibitions can be extremely small. When recently the Frick presented the London Cimabue alongside its Manhattan mate, in the small room next to the bookstore, a revelatory visual relationship was…


Abstract Expressionism and the American Experience: a Reevaluation by Irving Sandler


Is there anyone in our Manhattan art world who does not know Irving Sandler? Much loved, he is our Vasari, the tireless chronicler  who attends every lecture, goes to every show, and knows every artist and critic. In this well illustrated book, a revision of his classic The Triumph of American Painting, he focuses on 1942…


The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia, 1860-1989 at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum


Like some earlier Guggenheim exhibitions, Mark Rosenthal’s 1996 splendid, mindless history of abstraction and the more recent survey Russia! are two examples, The Third Mind presents much great art without a convincing visual premise.


Jim Dine: Hot Dream (52 Books) at PaceWildenstein


Pinocchio’s nose grew when he lied, and so he is a perfect role model for this artist whose magnificently chaotic installation presents the truthful lies of art


Terry Winters: Knotted Graphs at Matthew Marks Gallery


Some may remind you of Sam Francis’s Blue Balls, although Winters packs his pictures more densely. And his lavishly worked colors occasionally have some unruly relationship to 1970s pattern painting, the faux-Islamic decorations of Philip Taaffe and, even, the gridded portion of Henri Matisse’s The Moroccans. But whatever his visual sources, Winters makes entirely original, entirely resolved works of art.