Writings by Deven Golden

Shirley Jaffe, The Gray Center, 1969. Oil on canvas, 76¾ x 51¼ inches. Courtesy Tiber de Nagy Gallery.

Shirley Jaffe: Selected Paintings, 1969 – 2009 at Tibor de Nagy

Jaffe completely jettisoned the stiff grid and strict geometric shapes in favor of a loose, undeniably playful series of rectangles with interior forms.

Installation shot of the exhibition under review, showing, left, Robert Grosvenor Untitled, 1986-87. Steel, plastic, concrete, 60 x 108 x 96 inches, and right, Untitled, 1994. Fiberglass, metal, plastic, and paint, 38 x 167 inches. Courtesy of Paula Cooper Gallery

Robert Grosvenor at Paula Cooper

Ordinary inanimate objects do not, as Grosvenor’s works do, emanate persona.

William Carroll, NYC 466 2009. Acrylic on paper, 5-1/4 x 6-7/8 inches

Victor Pesce and William Carroll at the Elizabeth Harris Gallery

Pesce freeze’s the moment, Carroll celebrates transience, and together they create a deeply meaningful and thoughtful dialogue.

Sylvia Sleigh, Chelsea Garden 1967. Oil on canvas, 57 x 50 inches. Courtesy I-20 Gallery

Sylvia Sleigh at I-20 Gallery

Sleigh took a proto-feminist approach to spatial representation that was, and sometimes still is, confused with a naïve technique.


Chuck Close: Paintings and Tapestries from 2005-2009 at PaceWildenstein

The impulse to take Close for granted is perhaps all the greater because the work has an effortless assurance to it. But we must slow down, look past the facility, past the celebrity, to find the real investigation still taking place.


Liz Markus: Hot Nights At The Regal Beagle at Zieher Smith Gallery

There is a palpable tension evoked in watching the crystalline visage of Nancy Reagan struggle for clarity against the loosey-goosey stained canvas.


Kirsten Hassenfeld at Smack Mellon

January 17-February 22, 2009 92 Plymouth Street, at Washington Street Brooklyn, NY, 718 834 8761 It is hard to imagine an installation looking better in the industrial Smack Mellon main exhibition hall than Kirsten Hassenfeld’s current installation, Dans La Lune. Smack Mellon is a venue of raw physicality, with towering concrete columns framed in industrial steel,…


James Siena

Can an artwork, and by extension the artist, be considered obsessive? James Siena: Selected Paintings and Drawings, 1990 – 2004, the artist’s 2004 mini-retrospective at Daniel Weinberg’s L.A. gallery would certainly seem to beg the question. Fastidiously installed in the gallery’s two exhibition spaces, the nineteen modestly scaled works – none larger than 29 x 23 inches – contain thousands upon thousands of concentrated brushstrokes.


Julia Jacquette

Julia Jacquette: White Paintings Michael Steinberg Fine Art 526 West 26th St. Suite 9E-F New York, 212.924.5770 Mar 5 – Apr 3, 2004 Sometimes things change so gradually we don’t see it at all until we first look away and then, returning our gaze, do we find that nothing is as it was. This can…


Mia Westerlund Roosen and Kim Jones

Mia Westerlund Roosen: “Namesake,” new sculptures & drawings Lennon, Weinberg, Inc. 560 Broadway, Ste. 308 New York, NY 10012 phone: 212-941-0012 February 12 to April 3 Kim Jones: “escape from flatland,” 177 North 9th Street Brooklyn, NY 11211 718.599.2144 13 february–15 march, 2004 Height precedes width precedes depth – that’s the standard format for describing…