Writings by Greg Lindquist

Victor Pesce, Studio, 2010. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Elizabeth Harris Gallery

Tribute to Victor Pesce, 1938-2010


Victor Pesce: Selections, 1978-2010, on view at Elizabeth Harris Gallery


Andrew Moore, Palace Theater, Gary, Indiana 2008. Digital c-print, 62 x 78 inches. Courtesy of Yancey Richardson Gallery

Andrew Moore at Yancey Richardson Gallery


Moore’s subject is the transformative relationship of abandoned architecture to the natural elements, and, through time, its reclamation by the same.


Serban Savu: The Edge of Empire at David Nolan Gallery


Although the architecture’s physical decay reflects its economic uselessness, such romantic titles as The Guardian of the Valley and Mountain of Nostalgia lend emotional value to these dour and severe scenes. These paintings speak to the failed utopian ideas in Communism.


NOTES FROM… North Carolina


In the first of a new series of dispatches from around the US and the world by regular contributors, GREG LINDQUIST charts developments in his native North Carolina


Frank Selby: We Weren’t Never Here


Uncovering a sense of presence through an implied absence, these drawings and paintings explore a peculiar, discontinuous narrative.


Marcel Dzama: Even The Ghost of the Past


Marcel Dzama’s drawings evoke the ethos of an adult dreamscape while recalling a style of childrenís picture book.


Lisa Robinson: Snowbound at Klompching Gallery


Although Robinson’s snowscapes recall the nineteenth-century Arctic exploration that captured America’s imagination, her work also conjures our 21st-century fear of natural disaster—that nature will reclaim the manmade landscape by our own disregard for the environment.


Will Cotton in his New York studio, 2008, photograph by Greg Lindquist

Will Cotton


I was reading about Frederick Church and that he had visited the American West and South America– these, which were at the time, very exotic places. And then he made paintings of these places that people had never seen before. And in doing so, introduced this entirely new landscape to the public that people were very excited to see. And I thought, Wow, that’s exactly what I want to do: to build a table-top landscape in the studio and then make paintings of it. So the paintings become a record of this exotic place that existed temporarily, but something no one will ever see in person.


Ryan McGinness: Varied Editions


Laser-cut skateboards, flocked wallpaper, buttons pinned on raw canvas, gold leaf on paper, painted aluminum sculpture and fluorescent-metallic spray paint are all interwoven with his signature silkscreen technique.


Anna Hostvedt: Recent Paintings


Tibor de Nagy Gallery 724 Fifth Avenue New York City 212 262 5050 October 4- November 10, 2007 Anna Hostvedt’s small, intricate paintings offer a personal vision of the mundane. One could say she is painting what Georgio Morandi would have painted had his window faced a non-descript American parking lot instead of an Italian…