Writings by Jonathan Goodman

Jackie Winsor at Paula Cooper Gallery


Much of Winsor’s originality derives from her enigmatic yet evocative treatment of form, which conceals as much as it reveals.


Ching Ho Cheng at Shepherd & Derom Galleries


One of the last methods Cheng used included metal that, once it oxidized, existed as a rough surface of rust whose compelling alchemy gave his audience a remarkable exterior to consider. The magic of these pieces results from contrasts in color as well as memorable differences in the finish of the paint and copper.


Su Xinping: Toasting


One does not want to exaggerate Su’s gloom, but an unspoken anguish works its way into most of his art. His paintings beckon toward an isolation that is as moral as it is esthetic, so completely existential is its underpinnings.


Nature Interrupted: Curated by Elga Wimmer


Artists, like everyone else in the world, are worried about the consequences of global warming in the natural world; moreover, they realize that the damage is psychic and imaginative as well as terribly real.


Xiong Wenyu: Ten Years of Moving Rainbow


As an environmental activist, Xiong has created a process-oriented art whose dimensions are quite literally heavenly as well as humanist.


Eduardo Santiere: Draw In


Much of the imagery seems star-struck; viewers have the feeling that they are looking at a kind of intimate astronomy, in which planets and galaxies move about as they build centers of energy. Scratches on the paper add the slightest sense of relief, giving the picture its hard-to-recognize yet palpable sense of depth.


Fay Ku


Like Henry Darger, Ku refers to a mindset populated by children who undermine confidence in the world as it is. She presents disturbing tableaux, meditations on transgressions that make no sense, that seem to come out of nowhere.


Bingyi Huang at Max Protetch


Given Huang’s indirectness, we experience the scene as if imbued with symbolist forms, which reveal their meaning only fleetingly. Yet the painting does not feel deliberately obscure, but rather poses the question, How much must be revealed before the images makes narrative sense?