criticismExhibitions
Friday, July 22nd, 2016
 
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A group show gives Marxist voice to recent unrest in art and politics. ...
Friday, July 15th, 2016
 
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A group show explores the contemporary history of unconventional supports. ...
Thursday, July 14th, 2016
 
Cora Cohen, 015-11, 2011. Archival ink jet, pencil on paper, 21.25 x 22.5 inches. Courtesy of the Artist
Seen at the New York Studio School earlier this summer ...
 

Thursday, November 6th, 2008

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Baker Overstreet: Follies at Fredericks & Freiser


Hints of past layers visible beneath the surface are the only counterpunch to a solid machine that affords little room for speculation beyond its shiny and seductive design. The label of “primitive” given to Overstreet and many of his peers in contemporary abstract painting belies a highly stylized, self-conscious approach to image construction.

Monday, November 3rd, 2008

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Mary Heilmann: To Be Someone at the New Museum and Mary Heilmann: Some Pretty Colors at Zwirner & Wirth


Heilmann often seems be daring herself to do something truly “awful”—only to find beauty in it…The accumulated brushmarks and open drips make her act of painting transliterate into a kind of crime of passion.

Monday, November 3rd, 2008

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Cora Cohen: Come in a Little Closer at Michael Steinberg


Cohen makes evident tribute to the shaping influences of artists such as Kline, de Kooning, Pollock, and Wols and yet, with seemingly equal force of curiosity explores her fascination with the humble, yet visibly rich, impossibly chaotic, anti-heroic marks and stains of life from street culture: the entropy of urbanism.

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

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Abstract Expressionism: A World Elsewhere curated by David Anfam at Haunch of Venison


We need to understand properly the Americanness of Abstract Expressionism, without treating it either as a triumph of chauvinistic mythmaking or as an episode in the Cold War.

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

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Ching Ho Cheng at Shepherd & Derom Galleries


One of the last methods Cheng used included metal that, once it oxidized, existed as a rough surface of rust whose compelling alchemy gave his audience a remarkable exterior to consider. The magic of these pieces results from contrasts in color as well as memorable differences in the finish of the paint and copper.

Friday, October 17th, 2008

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Untitled (Vicarious): Photographing the Constructed Object at Gagosian Gallery


This adventurous photography survey, pairing historical and contemporary examples of sculptural construction and assemblage as subject matter, includes David Smith, László Moholy-Nagy, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, James Welling, Gregory Crewdson, Thomas Demand and Wolfgang Tillmans.

Wednesday, October 15th, 2008

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Nick Miller: Truckscapes at the New York Studio School


Just as many Matisse drawings and paintings made in Nice in the 1920s and 30s incorporate a representation of himself making the work of art, so Miller includes images of his working space in his landscapes. The effect is to bring us into the working process.

Sunday, October 5th, 2008

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Night


Nightfall can inspire fascination with the starry sky, optimistic hopes for fulfilled sexual desire, or at least anticipation of sleep. But it can also cause anxiety if you are lonely, which is why van Gogh described The Night Café (1988), at MoMA, as showing a place where “dark forces lurked and suppressed human passions could suddenly explode.”

Sunday, October 5th, 2008

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Cecily Brown at Gagosian Gallery


Was on view until October 25, 2008

Sunday, October 5th, 2008

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Janet Malcolm: Burdock at Lori Bookstein Fine Art


Malcolm chooses to photograph leaves of the burdock plant because of its lowly status in the plant world – as a common weed that grows “along roadsides…and around derelict buildings” – and because of its literary status. She notes that Chekhov and Hawthorne have referenced it in their fiction to denote “ruin and desolation” and explains that she prefers “older, flawed leaves to young, unblemished specimens — leaves to which something has happened.”