criticismExhibitions
Sunday, August 21st, 2016
 
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A show of activist art from across Latin America. ...
Wednesday, July 27th, 2016
 
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Twin surveys of Ader’s short but brightly burning career are mounted in New York and London. ...
Wednesday, July 27th, 2016
 
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Twin surveys of Ader’s short but brightly burning career are mounted in London and New York. ...
 

Friday, October 17th, 2008

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Untitled (Vicarious): Photographing the Constructed Object at Gagosian Gallery


This adventurous photography survey, pairing historical and contemporary examples of sculptural construction and assemblage as subject matter, includes David Smith, László Moholy-Nagy, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, James Welling, Gregory Crewdson, Thomas Demand and Wolfgang Tillmans.

Wednesday, October 15th, 2008

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Nick Miller: Truckscapes at the New York Studio School


Just as many Matisse drawings and paintings made in Nice in the 1920s and 30s incorporate a representation of himself making the work of art, so Miller includes images of his working space in his landscapes. The effect is to bring us into the working process.

Sunday, October 5th, 2008

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Night


Nightfall can inspire fascination with the starry sky, optimistic hopes for fulfilled sexual desire, or at least anticipation of sleep. But it can also cause anxiety if you are lonely, which is why van Gogh described The Night Café (1988), at MoMA, as showing a place where “dark forces lurked and suppressed human passions could suddenly explode.”

Sunday, October 5th, 2008

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Cecily Brown at Gagosian Gallery


Was on view until October 25, 2008

Sunday, October 5th, 2008

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Janet Malcolm: Burdock at Lori Bookstein Fine Art


Malcolm chooses to photograph leaves of the burdock plant because of its lowly status in the plant world – as a common weed that grows “along roadsides…and around derelict buildings” – and because of its literary status. She notes that Chekhov and Hawthorne have referenced it in their fiction to denote “ruin and desolation” and explains that she prefers “older, flawed leaves to young, unblemished specimens — leaves to which something has happened.”

Monday, September 29th, 2008

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Rirkrit Tiravanija: Demonstration Drawings at the Drawing Center


There is a limited range of drawing styles, which tends to be competent enough but generally stilted, illustrative, and a bit nerdish. One wonders whether the difference in treatment that does come across is purely a matter of the individual draftsman’s hand or whether different speeds of movement in the scenes depicted — orderly placid drudging through dreary East European streets versus violent clashes with riot-geared police in some steamy tropical town — account for these differences.

Monday, September 29th, 2008

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Diana Al-Hadid: Reverse Collider at Perry Rubenstein Gallery


Al-Hadid has been hooked on towers for several years now, involved in what can be taken as a reverse Watts Towers syndrome — instead of transforming found, non-art materials to create an aspirational edifice, she deploys considerable artistry to depict with a literalist intensity state of the art, fabricated structures in a frozen instant of failure.

Monday, September 22nd, 2008

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Geo/Metric: Prints and Drawings from the Collection at The Museum of Modern Art, New York


After being run through the pressure chamber of Conceptual Art, geometric forms for many artists working today are not indicative of a strict allegiance to any kind of school of non-objective thought or practice. From the storied history laid out in the rooms of “Geo/Metric” it seems that geometry in art has indeed reached its highest accomplishment: the freedom of eternal fresh starts.

Monday, September 22nd, 2008

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First Annual Governor’s Island Art Fair, Organized by 4heads Collective


The art fair is billed as “organized entirely by artists, for artists—and the public’s enjoyment.” What a pleasant change of pace from most of our big art fairs, especially the various Armory Shows, which are organized by dealers and have nothing but booths named for dealers.

Monday, September 22nd, 2008

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Robert Bordo: it’s always raining at Alexander and Bonin


His new exhibition, Three Point Turn, is on view through April 27