Criticism
Friday, January 6th, 2017
 
KarinSchneider_feature
Cannibalization is a creative act in the artist’s recent show of new text-based and reductivist work. ...
Friday, October 28th, 2016
 
Nathaniel Dorsky, Autumn, 2016. Silent 16mm color film, TRT: 26:00. Courtesy of the artist and New York Film Festival.
Two experimental filmmakers depict the world, using the methodology of poetry. ...
Wednesday, September 14th, 2016
 
rabinowitz_feature
The Israeli sculptor and video artist contends with physical manifestations of war and trauma. ...
 

Thursday, October 8th, 2009

Double Indian Yellow 2008. Acrylic on Canvas, 2 panels, 72 x 36 inches each. Courtesy of Walter Randel Gallery

Ted Kurahara: Portraits at Walter Randel Gallery


If we are hesitant to use a term so absolute as “the absolute,” we can, even so, acknowledge the extreme philosophical drive in Kurahara’s esthetic.

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

Kara Walker, 10 Years Massacre (and its Retelling) #3 2009. Mixed media, cut paper and acrylic on gessoed panel, 84 x 72 inches. Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York

Mark Bradford and Kara Walker at Sikkema Jenkins & Co.


To Walker and Bradford alike, density of visual information is an aesthetic choice that mirrors the mutliple layers of reality and complexity retrieved from subject matter.

Sunday, October 4th, 2009

Members of the Brentano String Quartet and soprano Susan Narucki in a performance shot of the concert under review, courtesy the Miller Theatre.

The Blue Rider in Performance at the Miller Theatre, Columbia University


“Black has an inner sound of nothingness bereft of all possibilities…”
— Vasily Kandinsky, On the Spiritual in Art (1910)

Sunday, October 4th, 2009

penck-installation-3

A.R. Penck: New System Paintings at Michael Werner


Saving the imagery from what we might call barbarous chaos is Penck’s highly skilled orientation and spacing of the visual components of an individual work.

Thursday, October 1st, 2009

Peter Halley, Rectangular Prison with Smokestack 1987. Acrylic, roll-a-tex/canvas, 72 x 124 inches. Courtesy of Mary Boone Gallery.

Peter Halley Early Work: 1982 to 1987 at Mary Boone


10 September to 24 October, 2009 745 Fifth Avenue, between 57th and 58th streets New York City, 212 752 2929 In the 1980s, when painting was beleaguered and abstract painting under much pressure, Peter Halley was one of the few younger abstractionists who attracted attention. His distinctive hard-edge pictures were accompanied by his theorizing that,…

Saturday, September 26th, 2009

installation shot of the exhibition under review.

Will Ryman: A New Beginning at Marlborough Chelsea


As in the films of David Lynch, a seedy underbelly lurks below this rosy landscape.

Monday, September 21st, 2009

Enoc Perez, Pavilion of the Soviet Union, Expo 67 2009. Oil on canvas, 60 by 80 inches. Courtesy the Artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Enoc Perez at Mitchell-Innes & Nash


Enoc Perez uses the contours of modernist architecture and feminine beauty to explore ideas of longing, nostalgia, optimism and melancholy.

Saturday, September 12th, 2009

Stanley Boxer, Somewhereamarbleman, 1990. Mixed media on canvas, 50 x 50 inches. Courtesy of Spanierman Modern

Remembering Stanley Boxer: A retrospective, 1946-2000


An exhibition of Boxer’s work runs at Spanierman Gallery through February 18

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

installation shot of the exhibition under review

Yan Pei-Ming: Landscape of Childhood at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing


By his critical reference to the illusions of the rhetoric of the Olympics, vastly expensive events which diverted funding from the fundamental needs of the population, he makes a powerful political statement, all the more potent because it is extremely elliptical.

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

Diana Thater, RARE 2008. 16 LCD monitors, DVD player, DVD, and existing architecture, 204 x 264 inches. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner Gallery, New York. All photographs by Pablo Mason.

Human/Nature: Artists Respond to a Changing Planet at the Berkeley Art Museum


By design, the show is a revealing jumble, expressing something of what it has come to mean to respond to a place (or site, region, niche), and something of what it can no longer mean.