Criticism
Sunday, August 21st, 2016
 
basta_feature
A show of activist art from across Latin America. ...
Wednesday, August 17th, 2016
 
bellamy_feature
Two new books document the life and letters of the influential dealer. ...
Wednesday, July 27th, 2016
 
ader_metrop_feature
Twin surveys of Ader’s short but brightly burning career are mounted in New York and London. ...
 

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

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Francesca DiMattio at Salon 94 and Salon 94 Freemans


However closely she references classical, renaissance and modernist genres, her paintings never lapse into nostalgia, but instead give off an arch contemporary emotion.

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

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Brooklyn DIY: A Story of Williamsburg Art Scene 1987-2007 directed by Martin Ramocki


In Julian Schnabel’s film Basquiat, the title character, exemplar of the flameout credo of the East Village, is assisting an artist-installer at the Mary Boone Gallery.  This mediocrity, played by Willem Da Foe, attempts to counsel the hero about the benefits of a reliable day job.  Basquiat replies that someday he would show on those very…

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

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San Antonio, Texas: Marcia Gygli King: forty years


Visiting San Antonio, Texas for Marcia Gygli King’s mutli-venue retrospective, ALISON HEARST discovered a robust art community of involved participants and high-caliber work.

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

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Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool at the Studio Museum in Harlem


The painter Barkley L. Hendricks caught not only the mood, but also the dress of black Americans in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Indeed, the subhead of the Studio Museum’s exhibition, “Birth of the Cool,” gives the nod to the development of a style whose casual hipness and intimated militancy marked a generation of African Americans.

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

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Oona Ratcliffe: Deep Forgetting at gallerynine5


March 6 to 24, 2009 24 Spring Street New York City, 212 965 9995 POETRY FOR ART presents newly published poetry (or poetry posted to the web for the first time) that relates, responds, or is dedicated to the work of a contemporary artist on display in New York or elsewhere at the time of…

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

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Joe Fyfe: Recent Work at James Graham & Sons


While Fyfe has worked with combining more traditional methods of painting with textile collages for years, it is through the overt focus on counterparts in this exhibition, contrasting the more serious with the playful and the reserved with the whimsical, that Fyfe reveals both the diversity of his artistic interests and the extent of expressive versatility he has reached in his work.

Monday, February 23rd, 2009

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Artist’s Choice: Vik Muniz, Rebus at the Museum of Modern Art


“Rebus,” conceived and spearheaded by an artist, Brazilian conceptual trickster, Vik Muniz, made me re-think the current trend of curator-as-artist and made me see MoMA’s amazing collection in new ways (yes, that old cliché). Plus, it even made me laugh out loud.

Friday, February 20th, 2009

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Life on Mars: The 55th Carnegie International at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh


Life on Mars shares a number of artists with Unmonumental, including Mark Bradford, Cao Fei, Thomas Hirschhorn, Matthew Monahan, Manfred Pernice, and Susan Philipsz. For a show of only 39 artists, that makes nearly a sixth. This is perhaps unsurprising considering the New Museum’s Eungie Joo served on the advisory committee for the 2008 International, but is rather suspect for a show that purports to be global in its representation. Suspect as well is that all but seven of the artists are from the US or Europe and only twelve are women.

Tuesday, February 17th, 2009

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David Diao: “I lived there until I was 6…” at Postmasters


For decades, Diao has injected deeply personal, even confessional content onto the placid surfaces and into the untroubled spaces of Modernism by way of a formal vocabulary grounded in the conventions of presentation diagrams, plans, text. The new work retains its erstwhile formal elegance and restraint, but rueful humor is replaced by a seething emotional undertow stemming from the artist’s inherited memories of his family’s displacement and fragmentation at the hands of the Chinese government.

Monday, February 16th, 2009

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Lin Yan at China Square Gallery


Lin has managed, through wit and a visionary interpretation of speech, to create a low-relief sculpture that refers simultaneously to American political and artistic history.