Wednesday, September 14th, 2016
The Israeli sculptor and video artist contends with physical manifestations of war and trauma. ...
Monday, September 12th, 2016
Process and history are manipulated and explored through Ruff’s use of found photographs. ...
Friday, September 9th, 2016
Is he a trickster, or a Warholian innovator? What’s the difference? ...

Friday, February 6th, 2009


Terry Winters: Knotted Graphs at Matthew Marks Gallery

Some may remind you of Sam Francis’s Blue Balls, although Winters packs his pictures more densely. And his lavishly worked colors occasionally have some unruly relationship to 1970s pattern painting, the faux-Islamic decorations of Philip Taaffe and, even, the gridded portion of Henri Matisse’s The Moroccans. But whatever his visual sources, Winters makes entirely original, entirely resolved works of art.

Friday, February 6th, 2009


Zach Harris: Requiem Reversals at Max Protetch Gallery

Conventional readings of “above” and “below”, of north, south, east and west are confounded in these panels by the integration of patterned motifs – diamond shapes and curlicues – that resist any such perspectival pre-conditions. The improbable worlds that Harris presents are less pictures of places than visual destinations within elaborate structures, guiding the eye ever-centerwards.

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009


Raqib Shaw at the Met, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Whatever stories Shaw might tell and whatever horrific creatures he might portray, they all are camouflaged by an overstimulation of the viewer’s visual senses. The excessiveness of information is severe and can be compared to 1960s psychedelic art or Persian miniatures.

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009


Al Held: Paintings, 1979-1985 at Paul Kasmin Gallery

The interplay of colors and contrasting directions endows the open spaces with their own specific movements. The entire composition is cropped cinematically to add implied drama to what can only be called a scene.

Sunday, February 1st, 2009


Kirsten Hassenfeld at Smack Mellon

January 17-February 22, 2009 92 Plymouth Street, at Washington Street Brooklyn, NY, 718 834 8761 It is hard to imagine an installation looking better in the industrial Smack Mellon main exhibition hall than Kirsten Hassenfeld’s current installation, Dans La Lune. Smack Mellon is a venue of raw physicality, with towering concrete columns framed in industrial steel,…

Sunday, February 1st, 2009


Figures du corps – une leçon d’anatomie aux Beaux-arts at the École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris

21 october 2008 – 4 january 2009 Galeries du quai 13, quai Malaquais, 75506 Paris Telephone: 01 47 03 50 00 Figures du corps was a rare insight into the archive of one of the most significant art schools in the world.  The anatomy collection of École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris is an…

Wednesday, January 28th, 2009


Stanley William Hayter in America: Paintings, Drawings and Prints, 1940-1950 at Francis M. Naumann Fine Art

Naumann has had the courage and good taste to break the medium barrier between Hayter’s experiments in printmaking, drawing and painting by presenting his work chronologically, regardless of – and mixing up – medium and support.

The resulting hang is very refreshing, and vindicating, to those afficionados sick to the hind teeth of Hayter being dismissed as a “technical wizard” in the etching studio, and therefore not, by extension, a “real” artist outside of it.

Tuesday, January 27th, 2009


Matt Mullican: A Drawing Translates the Way of Thinking at The Drawing Center

When Mullican asserts in writing that the “preoccupation with materials and processes seems to clutter up the phenomenon of what interests me,” he is making it clear to us that no individual person or thing can contain the entirety of that which engages him. Thus the artist reworks appearances as a means of describing the gestalt that both energizes and evades his hand.

Monday, January 26th, 2009


R. H. Quaytman: chapter 12: iamb at Miguel Abreu Gallery

Quaytman works in a mode of painting/silkscreen hybrid, an at once middle-brow and mass-produced liminal form that is ideologically adrift between the elite and the unique in a way that recalls Warhol. The show quietly crackles with ideas about production; perception and legibility; the nature of the “image;” and the play between painterly and photographic values.

Thursday, January 1st, 2009


The Art Critic by Peter Plagens

I’ve long felt that Peter Plagens and I had a community of interest, as we’ve both written about art for weekly newsmagazines (he for Newsweek, I for Time, having preceded Robert Hughes in that slot). Imagine my delight when I learned last August that Plagens was publishing his second novel, The Art Critic, in 24 installments on artnet! Twenty-four…