Criticism
Sunday, August 21st, 2016
 
basta_feature
A show of activist art from across Latin America. ...
Wednesday, August 17th, 2016
 
bellamy_feature
Two new books document the life and letters of the influential dealer. ...
Wednesday, July 27th, 2016
 
ader_metrop_feature
Twin surveys of Ader’s short but brightly burning career are mounted in New York and London. ...
 

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

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Rackstraw Downes at Betty Cuningham and Greg Lindquist at Elizabeth Harris


Downes paintings reflect a unique combination of aggressive conception and passive elaboration. Fervent perceptions of space enliven their broad outlines; details follow, filling in the story of each site exactly “as is.” Colors add atmosphere and light.

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

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Successive Approximation: Tauba Auerbach, Daniel Buren, Sol Lewitt, Mike Quinn and Robin Rhode


Too often group exhibitions, especially those that mix together young artists and famous figures, fail to reveal elective affinities. This tight small show, however, revealed that these nine very different looking works of art all shared a genuine concern with successive approximation. And in doing that, it also displayed the totally unexpected relationship of these contemporary works of art with the traditions of old master painting.

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

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Juan Usle at Cheim & Read and Silvia Bachli at Peter Freeman, Inc.


Despite different approaches towards scale, texture and color, a common attitude pervades each artist’s style that isolates a cool tension between involvedness and restraint.

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

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The Artwork Caught by the Tail: Two on Francis Picabia from MIT


Francis Picabia and Dada in Paris by George Baker and I Am a Beautiful Monster: Poetry, Prose, and Provocation by Francis Picabia

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

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Diana Puntar: Lived Live Evil Devil at Oliver Kamm/5BE Gallery


Their biomorphic qualities are undermined by the fabrication process, but this increases the sense of otherness they generate. They suggest imaginary beings that are not the product of fantasy, but rather of imaginative speculation on the real but unknown.

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

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© MURAKAMI


The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA 152 North Central Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90013 October 29, 2007–February 11, 2008 The late 20th century art world had a bad conscience about high art which was vilified as serious, profound, mysterious, spiritual, elitist, pretentious, outmoded and labor-intensive. This led to infatuation with popular culture (silly, superficial, obvious, materialistic,…

Thursday, February 7th, 2008

William Kentridge, What Will Come, 2007. Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery

A Surfeit of Genius: William Kentridge at Marian Goodman Gallery


Seeing Double is packed with elaborations of his trademark idiom: imagery transmogrified

Wednesday, February 6th, 2008

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Lisa Robinson: Snowbound at Klompching Gallery


Although Robinson’s snowscapes recall the nineteenth-century Arctic exploration that captured America’s imagination, her work also conjures our 21st-century fear of natural disaster—that nature will reclaim the manmade landscape by our own disregard for the environment.

Sunday, February 3rd, 2008

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Alan Saret at the Drawing Center, Richard Pousette-Dart at Knoedler


Physical gesture means the artist’s hand is present yet transcended: there is no question that the arcs or circles are handmade, but an unforced, lyrical all-overness creates a cosmic, suprapersonal sense of order and well-being.

Sunday, February 3rd, 2008

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Katy Grannan at Salon 94 Freemans and Greenberg Van Doren; Lina Bertucci at Perry Rubinstein


There is a pervasive ambivalence in Katy Grannan’s portraits: the gaze that returns the viewer’s is a mix of coyness and exhibitionism. The images themselves oscillate between similar extremes, building a visceral sense of the present through precision while succumbing to a remoteness that results from theatricality.