featuresStudio visits
Tuesday, January 22nd, 2008

Will Cotton in his New York studio, 2008, photograph by Greg Lindquist

Will Cotton


I was reading about Frederick Church and that he had visited the American West and South America– these, which were at the time, very exotic places. And then he made paintings of these places that people had never seen before. And in doing so, introduced this entirely new landscape to the public that people were very excited to see. And I thought, Wow, that’s exactly what I want to do: to build a table-top landscape in the studio and then make paintings of it. So the paintings become a record of this exotic place that existed temporarily, but something no one will ever see in person.

Saturday, May 19th, 2007

Brenda Goodman, Self-Portrait 4 2004 oil on wood, 64 x 60 inches (diptych)

Brenda Goodman


I had Kiki Smith over when I had just finished these and she said, You know, you should approach some galleries from a revisionist point of view because usually it’s a male in the studio with a model, or a male at the easel, and here you’re a nude figure in your own studio with all your paintings and your tools around you. There aren’t many paintings like that, she said. So I thought, well that’s interesting, that’s not something I was thinking about—I was thinking about what I feel in my studio, the vulnerability.

Thursday, June 1st, 2006

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Barbara Yoshida


You started your career as a painter and sculptor, and first became involved in photography with a project you did making portraits of women artists in New York City. I felt that male artists were photographed a lot, and I wasn’t seeing as many representations of women artists, and those that I did see weren’t…

Wednesday, June 1st, 2005

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Deborah Garwood


Your current project is called Evans Pond, Sequential Photographs, a Long-term Study. Where is Evans Pond? It’s about 80 miles south of New York, in New Jersey. The pond is part of the Cooper River system, which flows from Pennsylvania into southern New Jersey. Is it a familiar landscape? How did you settle on this…

Tuesday, March 1st, 2005

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Albert Kresch


A new model of modern art has emerged since MOMA’s 2004 reopening, one that is quite helpful in appreciating the long yet underknown career of Albert Kresch (born 1922). The reconfigured galleries at MOMA were hung to reflect a hard won principle: there have been “a succession of arguments and counter-arguments on the continually disputed…

Tuesday, February 1st, 2005

China Blue, Landscape, 1-16-04. Pencil on paper, 22-1/2 x 28-1/2 inches. Courtesy the Artist

China Blue


Sound artist China Blue was the subject of two solo exhibitions last Fall in Dijon, France and one in Tornio, Finland which closes April 3rd, 2005. On the eve of chairing a panel at the CAA conference in 2005 titled “Contact: Works that Create a Community Through Physical, Virtual or Momentary Relationships” she talked about her work with JILL CONNER.

Thursday, September 30th, 2004

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“Coaxed into fullness of existence”: A conversation with Rackstraw Downes


Published on the occasion of the inaugural exhibition at the Betty Cuningham Gallery in 2004

Wednesday, September 1st, 2004

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Susanna Heller


Heller is on view at John Davis Gallery until April 24

Sunday, August 1st, 2004

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Karlis Rekevics


Karlis Rekevics is at the beginning of his career, and yet his work doesn’t bring to mind any other artist. His complex white plaster sculptures, cast from molds made of plywood, masonite and blue foam, are multi-part forms with neon tubes and/or light bulbs attached to them. They are intuitively composed amalgamations of anonymous objects…

Thursday, July 8th, 2004

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Willard Boepple


Willard Boepple continues through July 31 at Salander-O’Reilly Galleries (20 E 79th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues, 212-879-6606) “Abstract sculpture has the wonderful potential of catching people coming around a corner and making them say, ‘what the hell is that?’” So says Willard Boepple (pronounced BUP-lee), whose point is proven at Salander-O’Reilly Galleries where…