DAVID COHEN, Editor           
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September 2007


THE CRAFT OF CRITICISM
David Cohen discusses his work with DEBORAH SOLOMON
- live recording at the New York Studio School
, Wednesday, September 26

posted September 21, 2007
DAVID COHEN on Sylvia Plimack Mangold at Alexander & Bonin

In Sylvia Plimack Mangold's work, an oxymoronically slow spontaneity mortgages painterly intuition to optical truth.


posted September 21, 2007
JOHN GOODRICH on The Skeleton in Art at Cheim & Read

More than 30 artists, from James Ensor to Andy Warhol and Donald Baechler, arrange bones in almost every possible configuration and medium as they grapple with mortality and our perceptions of it. The images of death range from the romantically morbid to the coolly cerebral.


posted September 21, 2007
STEPHEN MUELLER on Deborah Kass at Paul Kasmin, Dana Frankfort at Bellwether

Both are working at the intersection of language, symbol and abstraction. They are a lot of fun and offer several fertile fields for painting to grow in.


posted September 11, 2007
DAVID COHEN on Jessica Craig-Martin at Greenberg Van Doren and Kohei Yoshiyuki at Yossi Milo

What unites these artists — despite such distinct production values — is the way each documents a specific, historical, and peculiar — yet in some ways ubiqutious — scene. Like Dante or Boccacio, it is through attention to particulars of time and place that they are able to conjure vices that transcend them.


posted September 11, 2007
JOHN GOODRICH on Old School at Zwirner & Wirth

Zwirner & Wirth’s “Old School” explores a tantalizing mega-generational gap: the divide between sixteenth- and seventeenth-century paintings and our postmodernist counterparts.


posted September 8, 2007
ERIC GELBER on Yuri Masnyj at Metro Pictures

Yuri Masnyj’s art bears the burden of historical self-consciousness unwaveringly. He transforms modernist formal devices and elements of genre painting into a new system of signs and symbols. After all, as the title of the show indicates, “The Night is Still Young.”